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Ingevald

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Registered: 01/20/08
Posts: 273
Reply with quote  #1 
I did some research on the Japanese method of fig cultivation this past summer and thought that you might be interested in seeing some amazing photos from a variety of Japanese sites.    As many of you might be aware, some of the best information in English about the Japanese methods can be found on the Hawaii Fruit website.  http://www.hawaiifruit.net/index-figs.html   Go to the bottom of the page under the section "Figs (Ichijiku) in Japan" and check out each of the links fully.  There are some writings and lots of pictures.   On this page which is located in the above link, make sure you explore all of the photo links buried within - http://www.hawaiifruit.net/Figs-Japan.htm 

    Below are some very interesting links filled with photos and some text regarding the Japanese methods.  You can run the sites through Google Translator and you will get an idea about what is being discussed.    I did not include any of the technical papers that I found since some of them can't be translated easily because they were simply a "photo" in pdf form and the text could not be extracted for translation.    
 
http://sugimecha.exblog.jp/3320779/
http://www.shermantoys.com/502855.html  (incredible fig producer site)
http://itijikusanshu.blog26.fc2.com/blog-category-5.html  (this is a larger blog - many pages associated with it, some photos, etc)

  So, there you have it - fig culture in another part of the world.   The beautifully pruned plants are an amazing sight.  Everything is tidy and efficient.

Ingevald
Jules

Registered: 06/19/09
Posts: 16
Reply with quote  #2 
Thanks for this post. Looks fabulous that the main trunk is so close to the ground. Such a system would make winter protection easier.
Juliana
Austria


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FrozenJoe

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Registered: 06/08/09
Posts: 929
Reply with quote  #3 
Very interesting. I just looked at the first few links. They all seem to be the same variety. What do people think that is, brown turkey?

I also agree that their method would probably be a great way to grow fig trees in a colder climate. The trunk can get quite large and mature and still be easily protected in the winter.

Thanks for posting!

Joe

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Joe
Phoenix Area (Zone 9)
Ingevald

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Registered: 01/20/08
Posts: 273
Reply with quote  #4 
Hello,
    Most of the fresh figs that are grown for market are the variety Masui Dauphine.
Ingevald
fyvfigs

Registered: 11/15/07
Posts: 72
Reply with quote  #5 
INGEVALD HAD DONE IT AGAIN!
Looks like a regular hoophouse fig growin' machine.

Thanks,


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Stephen V.
NW AR
satellitehead

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Registered: 11/11/09
Posts: 3,724
Reply with quote  #6 
Bass, my interpretation about why you would espalier fig trees like that would be the same reason for grapes:  The closer the fruit is to the main trunk and root system == the shorter distance nutrients must travel to get to the fruit == more goodies directly to the fruit and less energy used to get it there.  Less energy spent means more energy to put towards fruit production.

This is my non-professional opinion about why you would also do this for figs.  I've heard many a vineyard keeper say that deeper roots and well-espalier'd vines = more concentrated fruit flavor on a healthier piece of fruit.

Just my 2¢, if anyone knows this is myth or urban legend or something, let me know.

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Jason
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jusalda

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Registered: 05/22/09
Posts: 152
Reply with quote  #7 
I can feel it.There will be lots of spare cuttings after members of this forum starts trimming their fig trees  ;-).
It seems like good idea to keep it low to the ground especially in colder climates ,much easier to cover for winter protection.

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americanfigboy

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Registered: 03/09/09
Posts: 544
Reply with quote  #8 
Are there any native Japanese figs in Japan? I ask because I'm about to go to Yokota AFB for six years and would like to find some to grow.

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Jarrett
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Wishlist: Hardy Chicago, Southern Brown Turkey, any other cold hardy fig for 6A
Ingevald

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Registered: 01/20/08
Posts: 273
Reply with quote  #9 
From what I little detail I know about the history of figs in Japan, I would say that there are no 'native' figs since they originated in the Mediterranean region.   I think that I read once that a new hybrid or hybrids have been created.    Take a look at the first few paragraphs on this document from Hawaii Fruit - http://www.hawaiifruit.net/Figs-Japan.htm  I think that is the best answer that I can come up with in regards to your question about "Japanese" varieties.  I hope this helps.

Ingevald
OttawanZ5

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Registered: 10/20/07
Posts: 2,173
Reply with quote  #10 
Great Info, Ingevald.
The following may be related to this thread.
http://www.hawaiifruit.net/cf/index.html

The production in some of the links you have listed almost looks like growing a crop of Brussels sprouts!
I have been thinking about trying at least one plant with the main trunk parallel to but close to the ground for easy winter covering on top and the ground heat from the ground for protection.

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nelson20vt

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Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 1,776
Reply with quote  #11 

Nice Collection of links Byron as usual. In the fig varieties a Monograph there is one fig listed as a Japanese Variety " Horaigaki " wich was a cross of Hâtive d’Argenteuil by Roeding No.2 but apparently its nothing special.


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FrozenJoe

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Registered: 06/08/09
Posts: 929
Reply with quote  #12 
How do you think they train them to grow horizontal like that?

Joe

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Ingevald

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Reply with quote  #13 
  Here are some more links that might be very useful and may either satisfy your curiosity or drive you seek more information on this interesting topic.     The first two links are very important in regards to the pruning method.    I have one other link/photo somewhere that shows how the long vertical branch is gradually brought down to a horizontal position and tied off, but can't find it at the moment.   Anyway, the other links also show something about pruning and most can be run through Google translator to get a better idea of what is going on.    

http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/raijin2491/56652664.html
http://www.geocities.co.jp/NatureLand/1913/itigiku/itigikusentei.htm

http://rms1.agsearch.agropedia.affrc.go.jp/contents/JASI/pdf/PREF/64-0622.pdf  article - Spread of Harvest Peak by Early Pinching Treatments on ‘Houraishi’ Fig Trees    This article should be of great interest because it documents their very carefully calculated method of pruning/pinching to maximize yield.   There is an English summary at the end of the article. 

Lastly here is a abstract in regards to one of the new cultivars created in Japan, cultivar H156-70. 

Well, hope this helps answer some of the questions.

Ingevald 
nelson20vt

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Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 1,776
Reply with quote  #14 

This is quite interesting, I have two cuttings that are growing in that shape right now I will give it a try just to see what happens. Thanks for posting all the interesting links was definately worth reading.


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OttawanZ5

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Reply with quote  #15 

I wonder if "Hirta du Japon" (aka Pastillier) has anything to do with being a Japanese cultivar?


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fyvfigs

Registered: 11/15/07
Posts: 72
Reply with quote  #16 
THANKS AGAIN INGEVALD. A real game changer.
Good timing for the 45 trees I have en-hooped & my ?should I tree? or ?should I shrub? dilemma.
Am now leaning heavily toward the former !
Now if I can just get it to stop raining (we get Pitanga's storms 3 days later)...


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Stephen V.
NW AR
Ingevald

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Registered: 01/20/08
Posts: 273
Reply with quote  #17 
It sounds like there is some interest in experimenting with this method.   I think that the best document on the method is this one that I had posted above http://www.geocities.co.jp/NatureLand/1913/itigiku/itigikusentei.htm and partially translated here http://translate.google.com/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.geocities.co.jp%2FNatureLand%2F1913%2Fitigiku%2Fitigikusentei.htm&sl=ja&tl=en    It essentially shows two methods - the horizontal method and the standard method, leaving the tree in more or less a normal tree shape.    You will notice in the last few pictures (not completely translated) that this is essentially the "pinching" method of pruning that has been discussed on the forums.   It took a some extensive digging to find these essential directions.

Enjoy,
Ingevald
drivewayfarmer

Registered: 12/08/09
Posts: 665
Reply with quote  #18 
I am very interested in learning about this , but I need a translation of the translation. I can't really make out what they are saying and the pictures don't show up .Do I need to go somewhere other than Google translator ?
Thanks ,
Kerry

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Kerry Zone 5 NH 
Dieseler

Registered: 07/10/08
Posts: 8,268
Reply with quote  #19 
Hi Kerry ,
i use Babel Translator Web Page translator easily found if googled, but many times from other languages things dont always how you say read like we are use to in english as many times there are no english words for what you are reading.
In translating these pages is a good example i have noticed.
drivewayfarmer

Registered: 12/08/09
Posts: 665
Reply with quote  #20 
Thanks for the tip Martin , Babel Fish translator is working better for me than Google translator on these .
Kerry

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Kerry Zone 5 NH 
pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #21 
Ingevald, I added them as Link Nos.110-123

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