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Dannyboy

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Reply with quote  #1 
What is the best fertilizer for figs in pots....
Thanks
Herman2

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Reply with quote  #2 
Ray Givan,fig collector and author,of the Fig Booklet5,recomends,Osmocote for figs in pots.Other say a well balanced,10-10-10,will do just fine.
I think both will work,if you follow the label,instructions.
Happy Growing
loslunasfarms

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Reply with quote  #3 

I use Dynamite instead of Osomocote, it has micronutrients and for me, seems to lessen the effect of FMV.



pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #4 

I don't have any long term figs in pots, but all the little guys get Miracle-Gro at 1/2 strength and hour or more after a thorough watering.


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james

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Reply with quote  #5 
There is no 'best' fertilizer.  Your needs will vary depending on what is already available to your plant through your growing mix and water supply.  In a container it is important to understand your tree is dependent on you to provide food and water in the proper amounts.  Too much can be as bad (sometimes worse) than too little.  Also, mistakes in a container can be more dire than those made to an in ground tree.  There are many factors which contribute to the overall health and growth of a tree.  Water, growing mix, and fertilizer are but three.  If any factor is limiting the growth of a tree, improving a non-limiting factor is not going to provide much benefit.  If you already have a fertilizer routine and are not getting the results you desire, it may not be the fertilizer regiment you are using.

I fertigate (water with supplemented with nutrients) my trees with fertilizer solution that is about 1/4 strength.  The ratio of NPK is about 17:5:11 + all secondary and micronutrients.  When the fruit get a little bigger, I will adjust to about 2:1:2 by reducing the amount of Nitrogen in the solution rather than increasing the amount Phosphorous and Potassium.  This is the second year I've been fertigating in this manner.  At the end of this season, I'll evaluate the progress and make adjustments for next year.

There is a thread in the Gardenweb Container Forum which is worth reading.  It is pretty consistent with what I have read about feeding in containers from other sources.  The 3:1:2 ratio discussed in the thread is a good start point as it mirrors the ratio generally found in plant material.  From there one can make adjustments as needed.

~james

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In ground - N.E of Austin, TX (zone 8b) 

2016 Wish List:  Dārk Pōrtuguese, Grānthāms Royāl, Lātarolla, Negrettā, Nōire de Bārbentāne, Rockāway Green, Viōlet Sepōr, Viōlette Dāuphine.  Iranian figs are always welcome.

MARCANTONIO

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Reply with quote  #6 
hi gang,
   i like to use organic fertilizers simply for the fact
that they feed slowly and contain many trace minerals.
 i also like to keep a layer of compost on top.
and water ever two weeks with fish emulsion and sea kelp.
although i'm not against the use of miracle grow.
although my old italian grandfather would say the more
fertilizer the less tasty the fruit.
well whatever floats your boat.

marcantonio
mulox

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Reply with quote  #7 
I have some Greek fig trees in pots that dried out in Feb/Mar with a unexpected frost, but the trunks appear to be healthy so I am trying to save them.

I have never used fertilizer on these 6-year old trees, but picked up some of this "Jobes for fruit trees" tonight 3-5-5 (see attached pic)

These trees are still small (3') and in pots, so how much should I use?  The directions on the bag show for very large trees in ground... 

Attached Images
jpeg 2017-05-18 20.25.58.jpg (117.26 KB, 22 views)
jpeg 2017-05-18 20.26.17.jpg (112.44 KB, 20 views)


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North Atlanta, GA - Zone 7b, very humid year round
New to fig growing, advice welcome!
4 trees as of 2016

Lewi

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Reply with quote  #8 
I am trying out Epsoma citrus and avo slow release (20 USD at Walmart fora nice sized bag) you can mix it with the soil when you repot.

So far so good...

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livetaswim06

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Reply with quote  #9 
Generally potted plants have more trouble with organics than they are worth. Burying the pot in soil, as far as I know, alleviates that to an extent. Simply put there is usually insufficient biological load in soil-less media we use to break down organics. Organic fertilizers in ground break down quickly and predictably. In a pot though, you could have one bacterium process mostly nitrogen at first leading to excess nitrogen and insufficient phosphate and potash. For anything planted in ground, just about anything would be fine since most plants get enough nutrients from the ground.

In a potted plant you are going to get the best results with approximately a 3-1-2 NPK inorganic fertilizer. There are organic ones of rough this ratio, but again organics tend to do poorly in potted plants.

If you grow in 50+ gallon pots perhaps this is not as big of a problem as there is potentially enough biological agents to break down organic matter into something usable reliably.

All this being said, keep in mind that I always say "tends" as your experience may be different. If you are using compost in a smaller pot and having issues, that could be the problem though. 

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-Anton
Zone: 9b, Santa Clarita Valley, CA
Growing: Panache Tiger, VdB, Burbank & Vineland, Falls Gold, Strawberry Verte, Atreano, Fico Preto, El Molino, Very Unk. Mission
drew51

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Reply with quote  #10 
I myself like organics in containers, and have had excellent results. But I also don't use a soil-less mix. I add compost, and sometime I innoculate the pots with fungi, not every year. I'm tending to go this way, but have no objection to whatever works for you.
I also like using compost as it can be wet here in the spring and compost has been studied to death about it's abilities to reduce even eliminate root rot.
I would disagree about not enough biological activity in pots, if that were true the soil would never breakdown and you could use it for years and years. Also working with bacteria my whole life if everything on earth were removed except bacteria. We would have a perfect outline of everything on earth. Bacteria are on every surface at all times. Organic fertilizer works in containers, and works very well.

I have also had excellent results with control release specifically Dynamite. If has a 3-1-2 ratio with micros. I like this stuff a lot, it also works very well. Impressive stuff!

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Drew
Zone 5b/6a Sterling Heights MI

GButera

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Reply with quote  #11 
Hi everyone,me personally would never go back to
using synthetic fertilizers(on figs).Some of the healthiest and
most productive trees I have ever seen in my
life were grown organically.Me,my mix is around
80% compost 20%peat ,about a shovel of perlite
per wheelbarrow load,and a cup of 3-3-3 organic
chicken manure crumble fertilizer.Also a handful of lime.No rocket science here,this works very well for me.
livetaswim06

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Reply with quote  #12 
Figs tend to be pretty hardy and grow well if you let them. As I said there are multiple ways to do it. It all depends on how involved you want to be, what your climate is and what you have access to. As someone on this forum said, all growing is local. I am sure I misquoted, but the gist is there. It's best to ask people around you what works for them. 
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-Anton
Zone: 9b, Santa Clarita Valley, CA
Growing: Panache Tiger, VdB, Burbank & Vineland, Falls Gold, Strawberry Verte, Atreano, Fico Preto, El Molino, Very Unk. Mission
rcantor

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Reply with quote  #13 
Since you already have the Jobe's, tell us what the recommendation is for in ground, how big your pots are and how big your trees are and maybe we can come up with a recommendation.  We can't know for sure and it's always better to err on the low side rather than burn your plants. 
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Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig
mulox

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Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcantor
Since you already have the Jobe's, tell us what the recommendation is for in ground, how big your pots are and how big your trees are and maybe we can come up with a recommendation.  We can't know for sure and it's always better to err on the low side rather than burn your plants. 


5 gallon pot with a 50/50 mix of potting soil and native Georgia soil
Trees are both about 3' W x 3' H

I was thinking of just trying 1 cup around the outer rip of the pot, but do I bury it or just leave on top?  
How much should I water?
I have some compost (my own, made mostly from veggies over last 2 years)
I wanted to put a thin layer of compost on top of the fertilizer... good idea?

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North Atlanta, GA - Zone 7b, very humid year round
New to fig growing, advice welcome!
4 trees as of 2016
Figrig

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Reply with quote  #15 
While the fertilizer I use can be tough to get, it has definitely proven it's value over the past year! You might check around to see if anyone in your area raises rabbits. Rabbit droppings do not need to be aged, will not "burn" your plants, and are a nice slow release fertilizer. I was told by one of the other forum members that "this stuff is gold". How right he was!! Easy to use and even easier to apply. My figs have grown like weeds this this spring. If you can get it give it a try, I think you will really be happy with the results.
mgginva

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Reply with quote  #16 
Bunny poop!
No need to compost.
I grow in pots - none larger then 15g - and use organics along w/ BP.
I try and add plenty of micronutrients.
I grow about 400 trees in pots in a soilless mix (farad #52).
Will be experimenting with biochar this summer.


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ADelmanto

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Reply with quote  #17 
About 200 trees in pots. Mostly 15 gal. I used 10-10-10 and lime last year. I was not happy with the fruit production. This year I'm doing 5-10-10 and rabbit poop/pine bedding/straw on top (2-3"). There are a ton of breba already. I use a commercial potting mix that is pine bark based mixed with organic soil. There are plenty of things in there to break down the fertilizer into a usable state.

I think the conclusion is that figs are very forgiving and easy to grow. If you are looking for the best results the answer is "it depends." I'm willing to fertilize once or twice a year so this is what I do. If you are willing to fertilize more often than that than another method may be better for you.

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Lewi

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADelmanto
About 200 trees in pots. Mostly 15 gal. I used 10-10-10 and lime last year. I was not happy with the fruit production. This year I'm doing 5-10-10 and rabbit poop/pine bedding/straw on top (2-3"). There are a ton of breba already. I use a commercial potting mix that is pine bark based mixed with organic soil. There are plenty of things in there to break down the fertilizer into a usable state.

I think the conclusion is that figs are very forgiving and easy to grow. If you are looking for the best results the answer is "it depends." I'm willing to fertilize once or twice a year so this is what I do. If you are willing to fertilize more often than that than another method may be better for you.


What I read into this thread is this:

For really young trees that need to put on size a higher N ratio seems prefered. (And a cost effective way would be pitandiego-Jon's 1/2 miricle grow method).

For older trees, 10-10-10 might be too much, and lower N will have less vegitive growth, and more figs, all things equal.

If I am wrong, please let me know.

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West Florida / Panhandle (Central time). Can get cold for figs...down to 12 F twice in last five years. Zone 8a, not counting the recent "upgrade"

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ADelmanto

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Reply with quote  #19 
Sounds right to me. Remember, in any situation with plants that will go dormant for the winter, dial back the N in late summer so the green wood has time to harden off before frost.
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