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BoyerHoldingsLLC

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I have made a simple compost tea using chicken manure and comfrey leaves. I've been watering my figs every couple days with this mix and I have been pleased with the results so far. I am in zone 6 in Pa. We've had an extremely wet season up until about 3 weeks ago. Several of my figs had leaves that turned yellow or fell off from all the rain. Many had stunted to little growth this year. I am pleased to say that since watering with compost tea several figs have "woken up" by putting out new green looking growth.

Has any one else had similar results with compost tea?

If so, what is your preferred mix?

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Craig A. Boyer 
WakesInc

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Originally Posted by BoyerHoldingsLLC
I have made a simple compost tea using chicken manure and comfrey leaves. I've been watering my figs every couple days with this mix and I have been pleased with the results so far. I am in zone 6 in Pa. We've had an extremely wet season up until about 3 weeks ago. Several of my figs had leaves that turned yellow or fell off from all the rain. Many had stunted to little growth this year. I am pleased to say that since watering with compost tea several figs have "woken up" by putting out new green looking growth.

Has any one else had similar results with compost tea?

If so, what is your preferred mix?


I'm om my phone so I'll try to post later with detail.

I follow elaine ingham. You can find her recipe at soilfoodweb.com
figpig_66

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I use worm castings 5 gallon buck cheap fish tank pump with air stone & molasses water Let it run for two days and bam. Good: grow in a few days. Kills small pest in soil and on leaves.
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RICHIE BONI
HICKORY LOUISIANA ZONE 8B WARM HUMID
WINRERS ARE VERY MILD LOW 20'S BUT WARMS RIGHT UP DURING THE DAY. SUMMER IS EXTREMELY HOT & HUMID 100 degrees 100% humidity fig tree grow like crazy but some split from rain & humidity
Wish list. Col de dame blanc
Col de rimada
Lsu numbered figs
BoyerHoldingsLLC

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Figpig_66 do you make your own worm castings or buy them?
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Craig A. Boyer 
figpig_66

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Buy them all though I would like to try making them
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RICHIE BONI
HICKORY LOUISIANA ZONE 8B WARM HUMID
WINRERS ARE VERY MILD LOW 20'S BUT WARMS RIGHT UP DURING THE DAY. SUMMER IS EXTREMELY HOT & HUMID 100 degrees 100% humidity fig tree grow like crazy but some split from rain & humidity
Wish list. Col de dame blanc
Col de rimada
Lsu numbered figs
WakesInc

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Forgot that the site is only working on mobile right now. I'll be quick and add a few thoughts.

I wouldn't personally call what you did a compost tea. Thats really a nutrient extract. I'm not saying that there is anything wrong with what you did, just that you were not actively brewing microbial life. Everything I have below is for AACT.

Elaine Ingham. She has everything you need.

No sugars. That includes molasses. Sugar breeds bacteria and most soils dont need that. You really want to be brewing fungi, so that means adding some kind of humus instead of sugar.

Oxygen oxygen oxygen. Spend the money and get a good pump, not some $10 special that doesn't put out enough air.

Probably one of the most under understood variables is water temperature. While colder water does hold more dissolved oxygen, it also slows down microb reproduction rates. You want your water to be aboit the the same as your environments temps - dont apply cold tea to hot plants or vice versa. Brew in cold water and you get microbes for cold weather, which sucks if it's hot out.

Most people know to brew in water without Cl. What they forget is if you are going to dilute to apply the tea, you need to do that with Cl free water as well.

A huge benefit of compost tea over an extract is the microbes are more active. Active microbes produce substances that allow them to stick to a plants leaf. That's important to fight diseases.

In that same line of thought, when making tea you need to physically get the starting microbes off the compost. Puting a compost bag in a 5 gal bucket with an air stone in the bottom and you will never get all the microbes off the compost. You need some kind of agitation to mix them up. Beyond that, air stones are so hard to keep clean that I don't reccomend them at all anyways.

Brew times vary. 24 minimun. Maybe 72 if you have a really good setup, know what you are doing, and can monitor the system for the entire time. For most novices 30-36 is the sweet spot. Ideally, to monitor the brew you need a nice microscope, which no home brewers have so keep it to no more than 48 at the longest.

Typing on a phone sucks, that all I have right now. Ask some specific questions and I will try to answer them.
BoyerHoldingsLLC

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WakesInc, what specific reactions have your figs had to this microbial tea? Are you making your own compost? I would assume you need to make really good quality compost to get the right microbes.
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Craig A. Boyer 
WakesInc

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Originally Posted by BoyerHoldingsLLC
WakesInc, what specific reactions have your figs had to this microbial tea? Are you making your own compost? I would assume you need to make really good quality compost to get the right microbes.


I'm a brand new fig grower so I don't have any evidence of reactions on figs specificly. Maybe next year after I have a season under my belt. Lot's of evidence on the web for plants in general, and my experience matches what's already written, so I won't recreate it.

I try to make my own compost. My biggest hurdle is that I move as little organic material as possible. My lawn clippings stay on the lawn. Leaf material stays where it falls. Etc. A huge benefit of using your own compost is it contains microbes which grow in your area. Buy a bag from out of town and you get out of town microbes, which may or may not be suitable for your area. With that said, you can make some really good tea from purchased compost. A locally bagged product is a great compromise.

Yea, a good start is very important. Crap in crap out. But personally I don't buy the theory that homemade is always better than purchased. I've seen some very bad homemade compost.

If you want to go the route of using homemade, spend most of your time learning how to make GREAT compost, not tea. Once that bag goes in the water, you cannot improve what you have - you are only multiplying it. Using a kitchen sink approach cannot cover up for a bad base material.
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