Register  |   | 
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Elruge

Registered:
Posts: 32
Reply with quote  #1 
Growing in pots under glass, I was fortunate enough to get brebas from mid May though to first week of July. Now I am reduced to store bought to satisfy that fig craving, with no sign of any main crop ripening. So thinking about next year I am wondering how to cut the gap between end of brebas and start of main.
Do I need to bite the bullet and forgo brebas on some bushes to get earlier main and if so, how many days/weeks will this advance main. Is this very variety dependent or is there a general rule that applies to most figs.
Thoughts on this or other tricks to get earlier main welcome.

__________________
John
South coast UK
USDA hardiness zone equivalent 9 (cooler summers)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, verte, and sultane.
pino

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,254
Reply with quote  #2 
Many people would love to solve this problem:)   Maybe if we all put our heads together.  

Putting aside use of artificial environments like greenhouses and indoor grow lights to extend season.

My strategy for zone 6 (hot dry summers and cold winters) is;

- Select fig cultivars that consistently produce 1st crop (breba) in staggered ripening times.  
Fig varieties I am testing for this are several san pedro types (Desert King, Dauphine), an edible capri fig (Gillette) and a few common type that seem to consistently produce bountiful 1st crop (Sicilian Black JR, Melanzana, Fico Bianco, LdA, Atreano, Capelas Azores, Petite Negri, Goutte D'Or).  
- Select several great tasting main crop fig producers from early ripeners to late ripeners.  (too many to count and already lots of posts on this topic)

In addition to proper growing methods (pest control, nutrition and water needs) 

- prune the 1st crop figs to maximize breba production(thinning type pruning cuts leaving 3/4 intact branches for breba production and leave several renewal nodes for next year), pinch/head off fruiting branches to encourage fig production and ensure adequate winter protection for the fruiting branches and importantly to prevent fig dropping make sure the figs don't get stressed during the breba ripening period.
- the main crop figs can be pushed to ripen little sooner by pinching fruiting branches after 6/7 leaves and dropping the brebas since they can delay main crop ripening.

With in ground figs this covers the season for me from the 1st brebas in late June to last main crop in November.  There is a small 3 week gap in August for the in ground figs.  This is covered by the main crop container figs that tend to ripen very early due to help from greenhouse in spring.

__________________

Pino, zone 6, Niagara, JCJ Acres

Elruge

Registered:
Posts: 32
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Pino. I haven't got any space for outdoor figs, so am restricted to pots. I do have two white marseilles, so next year I will remove some/all the brebas from one.
If I can bear it, I could also remove the brebas from my ronde de bordeaux.
Hopefully this will make for a shorter gap. Because of the natural weaker growth in the pots I don't always have to pinch, but do so where necessary.

__________________
John
South coast UK
USDA hardiness zone equivalent 9 (cooler summers)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, verte, and sultane.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply