Register  |   | 
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
aldaigle

Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #1 
I've got a Desert King that is about 4 years old, and I wish I had pruned it closer to the ground.  Is it too late to cut the main 3 branches lower?   prune.jpg  pruning.jpg

__________________
Amanda
Oregon, Zone 8b
livetaswim06

Registered:
Posts: 101
Reply with quote  #2 
I am not sure in terms of pruning, but it looks really good to me. 
__________________
Zone: 9b Santa Clarita Valley
Growing: Violette de Bordeaux, Panache Tiger, Starting Cuttings: Blue Ischia, Atreano FN, Samoa Sunshine and Falls Gold

Wish List: Georgia Violet or any figs from Republic of Georgia
ricky

Registered:
Posts: 243
Reply with quote  #3 
Well, I may be wrong, winter/spring pruning is for good main crop.

However, Desert king is good for " Breba" 1st crop, It is tricky to prune "Breba" fig tree, It will not have any "Breba", Correct me, If I am wrong.




__________________
- BC, Canada, PNW Zone 8 with windy ( Zone7 - branches damage at winter) 
- Wish list -  Granthams Royal, RdB, any heavy breba varieties or early one crop varieties.


Kelo

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 87
Reply with quote  #4 
I wouldn't prune it if it was mine. Looks good and healthy, too.
__________________
UK

Growing list: Brown Turkey, Santa Cruz Dark, Purple Genca, Noire de Caromb, Big Granata, Kadota, Sumaki, Kurtmani, Figu Niedda, Murra, Crosciu de Mullenti, Verdino nord, Black Mission, Atreano, Violette de Bordeaux, Picholetera, Albacor, Morro de Bou, Ficazzana Black, Malta Black, Fracazano Bianco, Madeleine de deux Saisons, Ronde de Bordeaux, Violette de Sollies, Grise de Tarascon, Marseillaise, Col de Dame Noir and Violette Dauphine.

 




Wish list -

Bebera branca, Castanhol, Carica viola, Sao Joao Preto, Zoundi or Ao-Gol-uden.


kevinmfduane

Registered:
Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #5 
I would not prune those. The structure looks great.
__________________
Kevin
Zone 7A
Northern Virginia
DonCentralTexas

Registered:
Posts: 506
Reply with quote  #6 
Ok, so I mostly agree with the folks above, but...

If YOU wanted it lower, and it has not leafed out, then yes, you could prune it lower.





__________________
Don  (Near Austin, TX zone 8b)

If you have these for sale/trade PM me:  Calderona,  Noire de Barbentane, Navid's Unk Dark Greek
aldaigle

Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #7 
OK, thanks all.  I'll probably just leave it alone then.  :)
__________________
Amanda
Oregon, Zone 8b
nkesh099

Registered:
Posts: 861
Reply with quote  #8 
Prune it after it's done fruiting (sometimes latter in summer).

Navid.
jrdewhirst

Registered:
Posts: 187
Reply with quote  #9 
I agree that it looks good.  But here's one option, if you have the room and really want a lower tree:  Cut (or, better still, air layer) the central leader just above the two branches.  Pull the two remaining branches gradually downward over the course of a few days until they are more or less horizontal.  [The branches still look pliable enough to manage this without breaking the branches or splitting them from the trunk.]  Assuming success, tie them to stakes, fixing them in that horizontal position.  Verticals will grow, bearing main crop figs.  Prune them early so that they are spaced every 6" or so.  In the fall, leave the horizontals but prune the verticals to 2-3 buds.
__________________
Joe D
Z6B, RI
CliffH

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 162
Reply with quote  #10 

I wouldn't prune it any more than you have. Since it is a DK, and will only produce a breba crop on last year's growth, you want to keep some old wood there. Or you will not get any breba fruit this year. You will always want older wood to get fruit. If you prune it close to the ground you will have to wait at least two years.

If you want to control the height, then prune one part down low. Then next year prune another section low, and then a final section the year after that. Then start the process over. Cut as much back as you want, but leave 1/2 to 2/3 with wood for breba figs. This is what I would do.

CliffH


__________________
Texas (N. Houston area) - zone 8b

Wish List: Bass' Fav, Figo Preto, Col de Dame Blanca-Negra, Col Littman's Black Cross, LSU Red, any great Unknowns

jrdewhirst

Registered:
Posts: 187
Reply with quote  #11 
Ooops!  I missed or forgot the fact that it was a DK.  So Cliff is right about the need for 1-yr old wood.

There is a version of the technique I described where you use the verticals as fruiting wood for brebas.  Prune to produce verticals every 6" as I described.   At the end of Year 1, prune half of them to 2-3 buds, prune the rest at the tips.  These will produce brebas next year.  Meanwhile next year, grow new verticals from the spurs that you left.  In the fall, cut back the wood that fruited to spurs, prune the new wood at the tips.  So you are alternating annually which spurs fruit on old wood and which spurs grow new wood.

This is just a "low profile" version of what's described in the video above. 

__________________
Joe D
Z6B, RI
aldaigle

Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #12 
Interesting ideas.  I had thought that I was just forgoing any significant breba production this year in favor of developing the structure.  I already pruned back a lot of the wood that would have given breba fruit.  Why do you prune the tips of the branches that you want to fruit next year?  Does that stop the branch from extending any further and allow it to just put its energy into fruit?  Do you always get more than one branch growing from a spur?  Is there an age limit for when they stop producing spurs?  If I waited to cut any of the bottom branches as CliffH suggests, they would be 5-6 years old I think at the time of pruning.  Not a problem? I don't think I need to keep it super low, I just wanted as much branching as possible while keeping it low enough to not need a ladder.   Thanks so much for the replies!
__________________
Amanda
Oregon, Zone 8b
aldaigle

Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #13 
I was actually trying to emulate the guy in the video, but was having a hard time visualizing how tall he made his first cuts off the main 3 branches.  At first I thought it was a lot lower than I did, but now I'm thinking they're more at thigh level and the branches will thicken into that space well?
__________________
Amanda
Oregon, Zone 8b
jrdewhirst

Registered:
Posts: 187
Reply with quote  #14 
Pinching the tips after the desired growth (e.g., 3-4') will promote branching and keep the size manageable. It will probably also result in more leaf nodes, including tightly spaced nodes on the branches, which will mean more brebas next year.

What I'm calling a spur is just a branch cut short. So no time limit. It's not like a fruiting spur on an apple or pear. If you leave a spur with 3 nodes, you may get more than one vertical but you should cut off all but one. That will bear next year's brebas. Going out the horizontal branch with spurs every 6" or so, you alternate pruning so that half of the spurs are producing figs each year. One has 1 yr wood bearing brebas this year, the next is growing new wood that will bear brebas next year. When the brebas are done this year, cut all the bearing verticals to a spur (trimmed branch) 2-3 nodes long. Leave the new verticals.

Whether you want the tree tall or wide or whatever is just a matter of preference, dictated somewhat by space. But if you don't want to use a ladder but do want to maximize your yield from one tree, then you want to get it wide. Hence my suggestion to bend some of the branches to a more horizontal position.

There is also a choice whether to make it wide in 1 or 2 dimensions. Given a short trunk, you can train permanent horizontals in two opposing directions, like a low T. Or you can train horizontals to all 4 points of the compass. If the horizontals are long enough, you can have some permanent branches. The key concept is that the low horizontals are permanent, while the verticals are a mix of one year old wood and new wood.

__________________
Joe D
Z6B, RI
jrdewhirst

Registered:
Posts: 187
Reply with quote  #15 
I think you can "head" the trunk at ~12-24", then train and grow the horizontals to 4-8' each. Verticals, which bear the fruit, could be allowed to grow 3-4' before pinching. That would keep the whole tree under 6' or so in height. You ought to be able to get a few hundred figs each year from one tree. The tree in the video seems a bit tall for easy picking.
__________________
Joe D
Z6B, RI
aldaigle

Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #16 
That is a whole new way of growing a fig tree that I hadn't thought about...thank you so  much!!  I'm not sure if I'll do it for that tree, but that horizontal procedure might allow me to put one more tree in the yard that I otherwise wouldn't have been able to.  Thank you for the explanation!!
__________________
Amanda
Oregon, Zone 8b
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply