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anthonym81

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Slightly off topic. I visted Bill's Figs this past Friday. What a wonderful man! Picked up my 2nd tree from him, Negronne.
While there I noticed he had a few Meyer Lemon trees on his property. It was my understanding they had to be brought inside and put in a sunny window. When I wasted Bill, he said he stores them over winter the same way as his figs, in his dark cold barn.
Anyone try bringing them into the garage instead of inside the house?
ohjustaguy

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Reply with quote  #2 
I've heard of this for citrus on other forums and have also seen it done with bananas. They will go "dormant" and need the right temps/moisture levels to make it through the no light winter.
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livetaswim06

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I stored mine indoors during winter in Buffalo. Low temps do not affect Meyers, mine in full leaf have gone down to around 25. If you keep them outside till night lows are around high 20s they go dormant. I am suspect as to survival with no light for months. They really don't need much light to stay alive. Anything below 20 and your leaves will die along with unlignified wood.
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anthonym81

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Quote:
Originally Posted by livetaswim06
I stored mine indoors during winter in Buffalo. Low temps do not affect Meyers, mine in full leaf have gone down to around 25. If you keep them outside till night lows are around high 20s they go dormant. I am suspect as to survival with no light for months. They really don't need much light to stay alive. Anything below 20 and your leaves will die along with unlignified wood.


Do you leave your tree near a window?
gorgi

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Me too have an 'Improved Meyer Lemon'; at that time I wanted a real 'sour' lemon.
I quickly leaned that any 'Meyer' lemon is actually a hybrid, and is not sour.

I also have a Key Lime and Kumquat citrus. I keep all well small trimmed and winter  store in my small GH.

>>> When I [visited] Bill, he said he stores them over winter the same way as his figs, in his dark cold barn.
That is good news if so.
  I always thought that (sub)tropical evergreen plants, need to be kept active up here north?

Anybody ever hear of a citrus called "Lemonade' before. I did, saw and tasted one; well it tasted just like lemonade (not chicken).
Tree was loaded with fruit (some branches even broke down under own weight) - tree is very thorny too.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemonade_fruit

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livetaswim06

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Quote:
Originally Posted by anthonym81
Do you leave your tree near a window?


Yeah I left it near a window, but it still lost most of its leaves. There are very few sunny days in Buffalo during winter. If there is enough light it will grow very large "shade" leaves which it will shed once you bring it back into full sun. I bring it in once lows hit 25 and bring it back out once lows are above 30. The reason for the difference is that it is usually sitting indoors at 60s all winter. Lastly, make sure you hit the tree with some miticide if you have mites. They thrive in dry conditions indoors and can really stress a tree. For me neem oil spray does nothing, I use Azamax which is a neem oil super concentrate which seems to do the trick. 

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71GTO

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Reply with quote  #7 
I bought s Meyer lemon last summer. I brought it in when it got cold. It slowly dropped all the leaves all winter and he one lemon it had. Now it looks dead and brittle.
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tsparozi

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Reply with quote  #8 
I overwintered Meyers and Ponderosa lemons and had no issue keeping them in basement along with figs. Temps never dropped below 40 and usually not above 50. The Meyers flowered nicely and grew new leaves starting at January end and is now transitioned back into hoop house until last frost dangers are gone... I had previously tried overwintering a meyers but kept it at 65 degree. The plant became troubled by white flies and eventually dropped leaves and then died.... Keeping the Meyers colder definitely worked much better...
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anthonym81

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Thank you everyone for the feedback. I picked up a Myer today at Home Depot.
I am either going to bring it in my basement over winter or inside the garage next to a window. Garage is unheated but usually doesn't drop below 30. Basement gets some radiant heat from my furnace and forced air system.
anthonym81

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Quote:
Originally Posted by livetaswim06


Yeah I left it near a window, but it still lost most of its leaves. There are very few sunny days in Buffalo during winter. If there is enough light it will grow very large "shade" leaves which it will shed once you bring it back into full sun. I bring it in once lows hit 25 and bring it back out once lows are above 30. The reason for the difference is that it is usually sitting indoors at 60s all winter. Lastly, make sure you hit the tree with some miticide if you have mites. They thrive in dry conditions indoors and can really stress a tree. For me neem oil spray does nothing, I use Azamax which is a neem oil super concentrate which seems to do the trick. 


Should I treat it throughout spring and summer or just before I bring it in?
Thanks!
livetaswim06

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Reply with quote  #11 
If you notice mites then start treating about 3 weeks before you bring it in. I've been in Buffalo, Arkansas and socal with this lemon and mites were always a problem. Only plant that has them too.
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Zone: 9b, Santa Clarita Valley, CA
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anthonym81

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
Originally Posted by livetaswim06
If you notice mites then start treating about 3 weeks before you bring it in. I've been in Buffalo, Arkansas and socal with this lemon and mites were always a problem. Only plant that has them too.


Thanks. I'm going to order a bottle from Amazon.
livetaswim06

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Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anthonym81


Thanks. I'm going to order a bottle from Amazon.


Azamax is good stuff. Questionable about how organic it is since there are so many warnings on the label. It breaks down completely after 100 hours exposure to sun and oxygen so if spraying fruit I would wait at least that long to eat after spray.

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Zone: 9b, Santa Clarita Valley, CA
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