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hoosierbanana

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Reply with quote  #51 
Sign me up too. I remember when the only selected seed source was TyTy.



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Reply with quote  #52 

I will want some, Bass. They really did well for me this spring!


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Susan

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Reply with quote  #53 

@Caney...sorry for late response.  My MIL says she knows of several patches 3 hours from me in Eastern Ky...but she has not been tromping thru those hills in 50 years.  I am getting ready to send an email to Kentucky State Univ pawpaw program to see if they will tell me where one can find pawpaws in the state.  Granted the season may be over, it just depends. Regardless, I will be more prepared for pawpaw hunting next year.  Let me know if you found/find any.


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Reply with quote  #54 
Bass, Any paw paw scions available? I'm looking.

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Little John Sheboygan, WI Zone 5B Wish List - Florea, Ronde De Bordeaux
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Reply with quote  #55 
Wild man, send me an e-mail, I have a few.
Ed

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Reply with quote  #56 
I am growing paw paw in zone 4 in vermont,My trees have been inground for 2 years, but have not grown much yet.

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Bass

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Reply with quote  #57 
little John, I got some.
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Gr8Figs

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Reply with quote  #58 
Quote:
But I have heard that some commercial and college growers tie turkey necks to the trees to attract carrion flies.


   My largest Pawpaw tree near my house normally blooms early in the spring before there are many flies or bees for pollination. I have used a few shrimp in a plastic bag to attract some flies and it does seem to help.You may also attract some unwanted varmints like opposums. ;)
     Unfortunately,the small amount of fruit on my domestic trees is small in size and the fruit on my wild Pawpaws is smaller. My wild Pawpaws grow more like bushes than trees.
March 24,2011

Wild Pawpaw
August 19,2011


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Barry Northeast Georgia 8a Wish List:Medium-Small Size,Dark Cold Hardy Figs

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musillid

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Reply with quote  #59 

I am struck by the coincidence of interest on this site. Last year I too planted paw paws. This year I am planitng more, and persimmons, too. Our local Soil and Conservation District sponsors a spring tree sale hosted through a Future Farmers of America club, selling 10 for $10 of these and combinations. Even if only a few take, it's still a nice mid spirng walk in the fields.


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Bass

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Reply with quote  #60 
We have a few wild Pawpaw patches in our area... Some wild ones are good. Here's an article I wrote last year.


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gorgi

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Reply with quote  #61 

Bass,

I have three 4" seedlings off the seeds that you distributed during our 2nd NE fig meet.

Wha should I do with  them?

I am very pawpaw-naive and have not even tasted one before,

more so growing it...


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George; Zone 7a, New Jersey USA.
Bass

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Reply with quote  #62 
The seedlings need to be planted in their permanent spot, if they're too small you can keep them in individual pots for another year. They come very true to parents from seeds, but you can also graft them when they're at least 2 years old. 
They're nice as a landscape tree, you can probably plant them in front yard. I'm sure your wife would like them.

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Reply with quote  #63 
Jon do you have any paw paw seeds that might do well in zone 4, Rex

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Reply with quote  #64 
A question for all of you experienced pawpaw growers.  I have several pawpaws on order this year and 2 that just arrived this week that I planted.  I expect they're all grafted from last year and so just have one season's growth on them.  Some of the instructions I got with the ones I just planted say to protect them from full sun for the first year.  However, I've read elsewhere that it's only 1-2 year seedlings that need protected.  I wouldn't think that this applies to grafted trees.

What do the experienced growers have to say?  They're currently planted out in the full sun and I'd rather not have to build anything to protect them.  Any other tips for a pawpaw newbie are appreciated!

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Bass

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Reply with quote  #65 
I planted them out with no protection when they were over 2 foot long, they should be fine. Just make sure they're watered well. I hope those that you got were not bare rooted pawpaws.
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Reply with quote  #66 
The first ones I got were barerooted, but container-grown.  I've heard bad things, from you and others, about barerooted pawpaws but decided to give them a try since they were grown in containers.  The root systems looked pretty similar to some container-grown ones I've seen.  Hopefully they'll be okay!  If not, I've learned my lesson.  The rest coming this year will be in containers.

Thanks for the advice regarding sun protection!

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Reply with quote  #67 
Bass and or anyone else, 
 I have lived on the west coast all of my life . While in the Army I was stationed west of the Mississippi river my whole career.  . I had not even heard of a Paw Paw fruit  until 2 years ago.  From what I have gathered , some taste like Vanilla custard . I haven't found any info on weather they will grow here in the Pacific Northwest .  I saw  potted seedlings for sale last year at the Olympia Farmers Market andI know that both OneGreenWorld and BurntRidge nurseries sell them here in the NW. Any suggestions on what varieties  would grow or thrive here in zone 7 Washington state?

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Cody
Grand Mound,WA 98579
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Bass

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Reply with quote  #68 
They will grow in your area, I'm not sure which varieties will do better for you. I know that Sunflower has done well on the west coast. It ripens earlier than some varieties, usually starting in late August for me. 


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dawgdrvr

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Reply with quote  #69 
Thanx Bass , 
                       Do they come true from seed? They have a tap root so pot culture is out right?   Should I purchase Seedlings or grafted Varieties? will grafted Var's bear quiker than seedlings as with  nut trees?  Sorry to pick your brain here ,But the only info i can find about them in Washington state is in the Washington State University's  Western~WA  Friut hand book is 2 sentences    
Quote:
Pawpaw (Asmina triloba) varieties currently
available are not highly productive and
information on their culture is lacking. 

Thanx 

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Cody
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Reply with quote  #70 
not from washington state, but this might help
http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/GrowingInformation1.htm

grant
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Grant
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Bass

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Reply with quote  #71 
Seedlings will bear fruit similar to the parent tree. If you're interested I have a few seedlings available now for shipping and will have some grafted in a couple months. They don't do well in a pot, although I've seen them fruiting in containers. Grafted tree bears sooner than nseedlings.
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dawgdrvr

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Reply with quote  #72 
Grant ,
thanks for the link. i read in the KY state trail that they need between  2,499 and 2,800 GGD's (Growing Degree Day's) to ripen. That bites ! in a good year I get 2,200 , but an  average year is more like 1,950 heat units . For the rest of the country , tomorrow is  the first day of spring . And this morning I had 1/2 inch of snow in my front yard.  oh well .

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Cody
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Reply with quote  #73 
Hey Bass, I'm glad this topic came up again. I still have the seeds I got from you last spring. I think I miss handled them for a whole I forgot about them for a few months and just left them out in a bag. I read that they need to be kept cold for a period so they will grow, I have kept them in the fridge over the winter in a bag with a damp paper towel. If they would even grow now I would need to keep them in a pot. I won't plant it in ground since I hope to move in the next few years. I guess it's not worth it to try to grow it if I have to do it this way?
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Reply with quote  #74 
If the seeds are kept damp and cold they are probably still good. Plant them about an inch deep in a one gallon pot. I usually plant about 10 to a pot and a year later I transplant them to individual long pots. 
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Reply with quote  #75 

Do you think they would be ok if they stayed in pots for a few years?


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Reply with quote  #76 
They should be fine in a pot for at least 2 years. 

Pawpaw flavors vary from one variety to the other. I like Cherimoya, and some remind me of Cherimoya mixed in with banana flavor. I have some that are orange flesh, some are white, and some are yellow. 

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Reply with quote  #77 

If you buy paw paw seedlings from a commercial seedling grower they mechanically cut the taproot when the trees are young and still in the ground that makes them easier to transplant but it also makes them easier to grow in a pot for a longer time the secondary roots won't coil quite as bad as a long tap root.


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Jim
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Reply with quote  #78 
I have a Fairchild-zimmerman and a mango coming here in a few weeks, I am pretty sure they are bareroot so my fingers are crossed, but they are grafted, 2-3 feet tall and from what I am reading I shouldn't need any sun protection for them?  If they are Bareroot I am guessing the soaking is needed for them as well, any other tips you guys have had experience that could add to success?

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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #79 
Update:
After all of the seeds I had planted directly in the ground last year failed, one of the backups managed to germinate in a bag and was planted in the ground late last season. It made it through the winter with two tiny leaves and has recently added more. (The plastic soda bottle is just a sleeve to protect it from critters--there's no bottom on it.)

In late winter I was sent a bunch of 'Mango' paw paw seeds which I decided to germinate indoors this spring. I put them in a plastic container (indoors) on moist compost, and soon saw mold forming on one seed, as well as on the soil. I removed everything, wiped the seeds and the container with rubbing alcohol, and tried again on moist Perlite. That did the trick--no mold, and 100% germination looks probable.

To accommodate the long tap root, I planted a couple of the germinated seeds in double-decker pots made from soft drink bottles (one seedling just broke the surface a few days ago); others I've planted in quart milk jugs and whatever else is handy. Several have been planted directly in the ground, but all will have shade, whether from a cover or nearby tree. I'll update in a few months to report on how they handle Tucson's summer heat.

Mouse-over images for description.

Attached Images
jpeg paw_paw_seed_w_root.jpg (66.46 KB, 24 views)
jpeg paw_paw_seedling_(close).jpg (133.83 KB, 25 views)
jpeg paw_paw_seedling_(last_year's)_shaded.jpg (116.01 KB, 23 views)
jpeg paw_paw_seedling_(last_year's).jpg (178.90 KB, 30 views)
jpeg paw_paw_seedling_(tall_pot).jpg (64.62 KB, 24 views)
jpeg paw_paw_seeds_germinating_(closeup).jpg (83.58 KB, 27 views)
jpeg paw_paw_seeds_germinating.jpg (100.17 KB, 27 views)


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Ken
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hoosierbanana

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Reply with quote  #80 
The mold was probably from some residual sugars left on the seeds. Washing them well should take care of it, but I had plenty of moldy seeds germinate just fine for me. It was a green mold, and I figured it was just the Trichoderma I added to the mix, but compost should have mostly beneficial microorganisms as well. White mold, or fungi would be a really bad sign though. Good luck!


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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #81 
Actually, it could well have been a fungus. at any rate, it was white and fuzzy.
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Ken
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hoosierbanana

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Reply with quote  #82 
White + fuzzy = bad

Good call Ken.


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Reply with quote  #83 
I thought I'd update this post with shots of a couple of my seedlings. Several fizzled out but I have four that seem very healthy. With regular water they seem to tolerate Tucson's climate just fine.

pawpaw 1 rdc.jpg 

pawpaw 2 rdc.jpg 


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Ken
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Reply with quote  #84 
They are beautiful, Ken! How old are they?
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Susan

Brown County, Indiana
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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #85 
Thanks, Susan--they were planted in the spring of 2012. Growth rates were quite variable, mostly ranging from two to four feet, but one appears to be a natural dwarf of just a few inches, although apparently healthy. Here's a shot of the tallest and the smallest (circled); both are the same age:

2015-05-27 pawpaws short & tall rdc.jpg 


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Ken
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Reply with quote  #86 
Impressive Ken,

When you started a interest in Pawpaw I doubted they would like your climate, but they look fine. Are these from the seeds I sent you several years back?

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Phil N.GA. Zone 7 Looking for: Bordissot Negra Rimada,  Del La Senyora,  LUV, Peloponisiaka aspra sika, Paratjal Rimada, Sangue Dulce, and on and on
TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #87 
Hi Phil,
No, I didn't know the best way to plant the seeds at that time, and so put all of yours directly into the ground, where they either rotted or critters ate them. These were seeds from 'mango' and likely pollinated by 'Overleese' that I got the following year from guy on GardenWeb, who said to germinate them indoors and plant them as soon as I saw the root tip start to emerge. That worked great, and nearly all of them came up.

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Ken
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possum_trot

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Reply with quote  #88 
I have some about the same age, Ken, but they have always been in pots and are only a fraction of the size yours are.
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Susan

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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #89 
It will be interesting to see whether they take off once you get them into the ground.
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Ken
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Reply with quote  #90 
Hi all,
I just stumbled across this post this morning over coffee - I am in deep south, Biloxi , MS and have been trying to grow paw paw for about 4 years - starting with a single small nursery tree and a couple of seedlings from a friend in Shreveport Lousiana.  One tree flowered fore the 1st time this season.
I started some seeds last winter and most of them sprouted.
I am interested in grafting and have some experience on other species - but have been told that multiple grafts on the same paw paw tree don't do well and the root stock will eventually overpower the graft - i.e. all rootstock branches must be eliminated for the graft to survive?  I would love to learn how to make a paw paw with multiple varieties.
Also - how do you guys/gals find your pawpaw scions and are there any recommendations for certain varieties.
I know I asked a lot of questions - just excited to find this discussion
TJ 
possum_trot

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Reply with quote  #91 
I haven't actually grafted any pawpaw yet. My seedlings are from selected trees and I expect them to be very good. Pawpaws improve with each generation from selected stock. Cliff England (England's Nursery and Orchard) sells pawpaw scion wood but he won't have anymore until winter of 15/16. As far as grafting goes, I don't know any reason why you can't graft several varieties onto the same tree. I don't know why the rootstock would over grow the scions - you would just have to keep the rootstock cut back.
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Susan

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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #92 
I haven't grafted any pawpaws yet either, but what Susan said makes sense to me. If you graft multiple varieties onto the same tree, it seems like you ought to be able to keep things balanced with careful pruning.

I will probably buy scions from Cliff England if he has what I'm looking for--I think he sells them for about $6 per stick, plus shipping. I also want to get a Shenandoah, but it's a patented variety that Cliff England doesn't offer--so to graft it onto one of my seedlings I'll have to purchase a potted plant from an authorized nursery and sacrifice it for the scion. Kind of a hassle and more expensive, but I think it will do much better in my yard if I graft it onto a healthy seedling with a normal tap root than if I tried to establish a small, container-grown plant in my climate & soil. My big question at this point is whether it's superior enough to the many excellent, non-patented varieties to justify the extra effort and cost.

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Ken
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possum_trot

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Reply with quote  #93 
Ken, I was told that all of the Peterson pawpaws are from a Overleese/Sunflower cross. I bought several of them as bare root plants several years ago but ended up losing all except Susquahanna and Allegany. I will never buy bare root pawpaws again but I have actually had very good luck with small potted plants as long as I get them planted. I really like some of the genetics of Cliff's special pawpaw seed and I have some in the fridge waiting to be planted. I think they may produce even better plants than the Peterson pawpaws. I highly recommend them.
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Susan

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Reply with quote  #94 
Can anyone else give us updates on their Pawpaw plantings?

Should be some fruit hanging now.

All of my trees are still too young to have fruit although about five trees had blooms this year.

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Charles in Pensacola AKA Darkman
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Reply with quote  #95 
I saw a number of posting on wild Paw Paws.  I recently found some on the property that our company owns.  Actually I found a lot of Paw Paw groves.  I went out today and found at least a dozen fruit about 3" long.  Here are my questions.  Fruit production seems low for so many trees but they are in fairly shaded are.  I have found at least 7 or 8 patches where I assume the tree's spread by runner?  I have by no means exhausted the area and I see many other patches in the distance but my lunch hour isn't long enough to check them all out..yet.
The trees are trees with the oldest easily being 15-20 foot tall.

Here's my questions:
1.  There are lone seedling? in the woods that are about 6-8" in height.  Do you think they could be transplanted?
2.  Where the tree's did fruit there are clusters of 4-5 fruits.  Is that normal?
3.  The size seems good to me.  Around here Paws Paws ripen in August-Sept. and the fruit seems big already.  Is this a normal size?

Next time I am out I will bring my camera so I can take more pictures.  The trees seem really vigorous so I am thinking they would be excellent root stock if nothing else.

I'm hoping that maybe I can to some comparison tasting with some of the named varieties to see how they stack up.

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possum_trot

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Reply with quote  #96 
 Pawpaws spread by suckers and they are difficult to transplant. I have heard of people doing it but I wonder if the trees are still alive the following spring. I have several large groves in the forest behind my house that never fruit - I think they are all just suckers from the original tree. If you have large fruit on a wild tree, and good clusters, I would mark the stems incase you want to go back and collect some scion wood this winter for grafting. You can also save the seed from good fruit and store it in the fridge until spring.
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Susan

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Reply with quote  #97 
I have always been told that transplanting is extremely difficult. I'm assuming they were transplanting dormant trees. My limited experience says different. I have a friend that lives near Marriana FL. He has several named varieties unfortunately the tags have long since vanished. To the point....I visited him two years ago in the Spring and I dug up four trees about three feet tall. They were all root suckers. As we were leaving I spotted a root sucker about twelve feet tall and dug it too. I tried to dig about eighteen inches around the trunk to get a root ball. I ended up bare rooting all of them due to his sandy soil. Threw all of them in the back of my truck with only some garbage bags protecting the roots and drove back to Pensacola. Planted them all in my PawPaw patch the next day. The results....I lost one of the smaller ones. I expected to lose the tall one since I mangled the root ball digging it but it has established itself nicely and even had a few blooms this year. Maybe I just got lucky but i'll take lucky any day!

I have sourced trees from four different sources and geographical areas. I should have good cross pollination. One was successfully grafted with Arkansas #9. I am looking to graft more varieties to some of the other trees. I hope to have fruit in the next two years.

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Charles in Pensacola AKA Darkman
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possum_trot

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Reply with quote  #98 
Thanks, Charles! That is really great to hear. I might try to dig up some this spring.
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Susan

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Reply with quote  #99 
Charles, were they still dormant when you dug them up? How early in the spring was it? Please let us know how they do over the winter. The problem that I always have had with bare root pawpaws was that they seemed to die over the winter after looking good spring, summer, and fall.
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TucsonKen

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Reply with quote  #100 
I thought I'd revive this old thread to give an update on how my pawpaws are doing in Tucson. I planted several pre-germinated seeds directly in the ground in 2012. Some died, but I still have six trees--two are very small, two are a couple of feet tall, and two are between 5 and 6 feet. Both larger trees bloomed this year (about six flowers each), and after being naturally pollinated by flies, are starting to set a few fruit. I don't know if the fruit will be able to fully mature on such small trees, but it's an encouraging start!

start! rdc 2017-04-20 pawpaw flower & fly_5639.jpg  rdc 2017-04-20 pawpaw seedling_5636.jpg  rdc crp 2017-04-20 pawpaw fruit set_5625.jpg


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