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cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #1 
I was looking on EBay for pots, and I was wondering.... What's the cheapest, most practical way of pulling this off? What's the best size to get things done? Just buy a bunch of 5 gallon and be done with it, or get several different sizes and up-pot? Is it better to give the figs plenty of room to begin with, or do they somehow benefit from being constantly yanked out of the dirt? :D

What pot size is the most practical, economical final size for a moveable plant? What kind of pots are good? Sellers? Used pots??? (I saw some of those on EBay).

Any soil recommendations? Or should I just find some nice rich dirt and throw a little lime in it like I did last time? :D

I'm going to be embarking on the risky task of starting from a lot of expensive cuttings for the very first time! :O

I live with my parents and don't make much money, so I can't afford screw-ups. I actually did experiment with trying to root some green prunings, but they weren't dormant. They didn't root either.  :/

I've got an old dusty (probably broken) bag of perlite I found laying around. I gather there are a few ways to do it... Perlite, peat moss, and paper towels? Weren't those the three common methods? (Well, besides sticking them into the ground) :D Someone-- maybe Driveway Farmer, mentioned using disinfectant??? Was it bleach solution???

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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
rcantor

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Reply with quote  #2 
Some nurseries and landscapers will give pots away for free.  For soil you have to see what's available locally.  Does some town or county government give away pine bark chunks?  Can you get free manure to compost?  Is someone wanting topsoil removed? It all depends what's available cheap.
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Zone 6, MO

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Galicia Negra, Martineca Rimada, De La Reina - Pons, Genovese Nero - Rafed's, Fioroni Ruvo, Sbayi, Souadi, Acciano, Any Rimada, Sodus Sicilian, any Bass, Pons or Axier fig, any great tasting fig.
SarinaP

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Reply with quote  #3 
If you're planning out how to root, read lots of threads... For me, direct potting into cups with sandwich bags over top worked. Just make sure you get soft clear plastic cups so you can cut holes in the bottoms and cheapo sandwich bags. Dollar tree also has a very fluffy potting mix with perlite and sphagnum moss in it.
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Growing in Zone 7a: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1_uY4GZ90-gNAdZFS0enckqojLQT2-8cp2pcsRp-Bdqg/edit?usp=sharing

Wishlist: leaning toward French cultivars!
DonCentralTexas

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Reply with quote  #4 
For pots I would try Craigslist.  You can often find used nursery pots there, but more often, 5 gallon pails.

I once got 40 kitty litter pails for free they are 4 gallons and square, these are awesome and last about 3 seasons in the sun.

For larger pots I have bought plastic drums, 55 gallon, and cut them in half, lots of work but economical.

Also Craigslist for cheap to free manure.

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Don  (Near Austin, TX zone 8b)

If you have these for sale/trade PM me:  Calderona,  Noire de Barbentane, Navid's Unk Dark Greek
eaglet2

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Reply with quote  #5 
Pots for free
I just picked up (4) 8"x 12" x15" ht heavy plastic food grade bakery icing containers from Sams club, free, also 6 round .  This was suggested on this forum.   The 8x12 will make a self watering pot as 15 " deep allows room at the bottom.   The supply seems unlimited.

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willei
eaglet2

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Reply with quote  #6 
Pots for free
I just picked up (4) 8"x 12" x15" ht heavy plastic food grade bakery icing containers from Sams club, free, also (6) 10" round .  This was suggested on this forum.   The 8x12 will make a self watering pot as 15 " deep allows room at the bottom.   The supply seems unlimited.

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willei
brianm

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Reply with quote  #7 
I have bought many many pots. However recently I went to a new development being built and found a house getting the landscape installed. They had 40-50#1s and 5#15s in there truck. I asked them if I could have them and they were happy to give them to me.
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drivewayfarmer

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi cheapnewb ,
I didn't mention disinfecting cuttings to you as I no longer do that myself.
I like the propagation approach that Tim Clymer is using :
http://www.threefoldfarm.org/blog/simple-fig-propagation
Been doing something similar starting this time of season and raising them along with any veggie seedlings I have going , using  3 inch deep pots that fit 32 to a tray.
Sent you a few extra cuttings to play with along with your order today.

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Kerry Zone 5 NH
Wish list :Galicia Negra , Col de Dame Blanca/Negra  .
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #9 
Thanks Driveway Farmer! Much appreciated!

I vaguely remember reading about the disinfectant in some thread. I don't remember how old it was.

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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #10 
Well, I've already got parafilm, potting mix, and perlite-- so maybe all I need are the cuttings and some disposable cups??? I wonder... paper, plastic, or styrofoam...???
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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #11 
I just found that my potting soil is actually Scott's Premium Topsoil. Is this a good soil to use? I have some perlite to add to it. Should I buy some more specialized stuff?
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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #12 
It seems like the fellow who rooted those cuttings with such high success in the provided link used some pretty special soil mix. The makeup of that stuff might explain why he did so well without rotting. However, the cheapest package of that stuff that I found on Amazon so far is nearly 50 bucks. What kind of stuff do I really need? Light? Fluffy? Beneficial fungus?  Anti-rot properties? Sphagnum/Peat moss?

I take it that some people don't like Scott's Premium Topsoil. It's got me thinking that maybe I should grab some better stuff.

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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
SarinaP

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Reply with quote  #13 
I've used both the Dollar Tree stuff (sphagnum moss/perlite mix) and Miracle Gro Moisture Control Potting Mix.  Lots of members don't like MG stuff because of gnats, but I didn't have an issue with that.

Topsoil is more for established plants to enrich your soil if you're planting in-ground or mixing with fluffier stuff when you up-pot.  The Dollar Tree stuff is $1, the MG stuff is about $5 for a big bag.

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Growing in Zone 7a: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1_uY4GZ90-gNAdZFS0enckqojLQT2-8cp2pcsRp-Bdqg/edit?usp=sharing

Wishlist: leaning toward French cultivars!
EB18702

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Reply with quote  #14 
i recently rooted some cuttings with 100% success all I used for my medium was coco coir. I placed the cutting in large plastic bags with the coco coir all labeled. then placed all the bags in a small tote and put above my fluorescent grow lights. it stayed about 85-90 degrees in there above there. the problem is after 3 weeks they root and you need to pot them up. use a nice light mix. add some of the coir to your potting mix, don't over water. also you now need to keep the humidity up for 2 weeks and very little light. if you uncover them and let the humidity get to low they will wilt and die. also be very slow with bringing them to light. the hard part for me has been getting them used to the rooms environment now. just take your time.
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Growing: DK, VdB, Brown Turkey, Hardy Chicago, Black Mission, Verte, Negronne, Natalina BI, U. Italian Yellow BI , U. Yellow Greek AD, U. South Plainfield, U. Orangeburg 
U. Carini RG,
Rooting:
Prosciutto, Naples Dark, Azores Dark, Columbaro Nero, De La Tira, I376, Des Roig Manyo, Greek Church U.

Wishlist: ANY PEACH OR PLUM SCION PLEASE PM ME. Smith, any in ground figs for zone 6.
Erik
zone 6A northeast Pa
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #15 
I bought some more perlite, a bale of sphagnum moss, some Miracle Grow Potting Soil, and some dollar store potting soil.

Today I mixed some of the peat moss with a couple large cups of wetted perlite. Should I mix in potting soil? I am wondering if the moss/perlite by itself isn't better for preventing rot. On the other hand, do I need the fertilizer and stuff in potting soil if I'm starting them in plastic cups?

How much perlite do you guys recommend? That stuff is expensive. I'll probably pot my cuttings tomorrow.

Also, is it better/safer to stick with the full size cuttings, or would it be a good idea to cut them into smaller pieces? My current plan involves using disposable drinking cups. I saw a video where someone cut them into 2 inch pieces (but he used a different method). Does this reduce reliability or vigor, especially for my chosen method?

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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
Esteban_McFig

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Reply with quote  #16 
I scouted Craigslist and joined multiple Facebook local gardening groups for freebie pots. Eventually, a woman approx 1 mile from my home had over 200 trade gallon (approx. 3 litre) plastic pots AND their carriers free to a good home. I snagged 110 of those and about 80 pint sizers with their own carriers for other grow projects. Price: zero, add a little for the gas to drive over there to pick up the stuff. And the water, soap and bleach to clean and sterilize them...

Other expenses for starting approx 180 cuttings and up-potting twice (from starting in moss in ziploc bags in shoeboxes inside of humidity bins, to 24 oz. cups with grow media, to gallon-size plastic pots):
2 totes/humidity bins from Costco at about $7 each; 12 plastic shoeboxes with lids at $.99 each; four or five "bales" of the good orchid sphagnum Moss at about $5 each; four or five sleeves of 25 each 24 oz. clear plastic Smart&Final cups at I think about $7 each; two sleeves of opaque blue plastic 24 oz. cups, also $6 or $7 each; 1massive Bale (over 60 lbs) of ProMix HP soiless potting mix, about $55 with tax; 3 each smallish bags of perlite and vermiculite, $5 or $7 each. I also laid in some very fine fertilizer (Organicare Pure, something like $25) for sbout 20 lbs--should last a couple years), some cheap fish emulsion stuff (something like $9/gallon), another Organicare product called Silicon Blast ($20) to help roots with hot weather as I move the starts outdoors here in Phoenix, AZ. Some ancillary expense for tree labels, Ziploc bags, a bottle of household bleach, a couple new spray bottles. All in: looks like something close to $285 maybe $300, NOT including the cost of the cuttings themselves which if I remember was also something like $300 or $400. That latter figure was to go from 1 in-ground fig tree, to buying an additional 3 West coast-grown whips, and an additional approx 50 varieties of either treelet starts or about 180 cuttings. Obviously, a more sane person might start with just a few varieties, but I had the time and the "focus," so... Point is, this coulda been much less costly if I had gone a little slower

But a lot of this stuff is a one-time investment; I recycle even those plastic cups that I don't have to cut up to free very insistent roots before up-potting to the gallon containers. If I still have the mania next year, I would only have to refresh my inventory of potting media, and look for new gallon (or whatever size) plastic pots

Those were my economics to put through about 70% of the 131 cuttings I've started so far, the balance having failed at one stage or another. Still have about 50 to start

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Stephen A.
Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b)
Wish list: Syrian varieties, esp. Abyad, Barada, Hmari, Sefrawi, Sumaki. Ok, well also Moroccan varieties, whichever are best
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #17 
Well, I've pretty much come to the conclusion that I need to get some bulk nursery pots. For now I have my eyes set on A.M Leonard. 

I doubt drinking cups are the best to use. They seem a little cramped for the roots. My cuttings have been rooting, by the way :), and cheap sphagnum peat moss works. :). I am thinking I should buy some trade gallon (2.5 quart) at least. What would be the best size to go with without going too small and needing to buy too many sizes and disturb the roots or going too big and dealing with any disadvantages there. Trade gallon? Full gallon? 2 gallon? 3 gallon? I might start with trade gallon and then up-pot to 3 gallon? Blow molded, thermomolded? injection molded? pressure molded? Should I get the cheapest thing I can get even if it's paper thin?

These seem kinda promising. http://www.amleo.com/haviland-high-performance-series-thermoformed-hdpe/p/VP-HHP/


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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #18 
Also these: http://www.amleo.com/nsi-nursery-supplies-pressure-formed-nursery-containers/p/VP-PF/
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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
hoosierbanana

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Reply with quote  #19 
Fabric containers are cheaper and prevent root circling, overwatering, and roots overheating in the sun. You can sew them yourself from spun landscape fabric if you really want to be cheap ;)  http://www.amleo.com/root-pouch-degradable-pots/p/VP-RPXXXX/
 If you can find pine bark mulch that is about 1/2" in size and smaller that should be adequate to provide aeration instead of perlite. It requires more frequent fertilizing and something like lime or compost to raise the ph but much cheaper than perlite.

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cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #20 
Fabric pots.... I'm a little doubtful whether that's the best route for me. Not quite sold on the idea yet, and I'm not sure I want to go through the trouble of sewing together stuff. At that rate, I could use paper feed bags or something as we have a lot of them laying around. But then, they might fall apart. ---Feeling doubtful--- :/

?????? 

:?

:/

I should be able to get plastic ones just as cheap, and I can reuse them for many years, right? Keeps it simple? Thanks for the pine bark idea, though I may end up using premixed potting soil anyway.

I don't have any of my plants in full sun right now. I'm too worried about wildlife bothering them. I've got a lot of apple trees I grafted that I assume have been barked by rabbits or something. That doesn't even mention what the deer do to the larger trees. It's crazy out there... 

I reckon that nothing really bothers figs that much (apart from mice/rats in certain overwintering cases), but I am still a little wary.

I notice that those little red cups do warm up some in the sunny window sill. I wonder if that is hurting them. Since they are on the inside of the glass window behind the bug screen, they're not getting the full sun anyway. ???

Anyway, those fabric containers may have some interesting advantages...

Speaking of light, when initially rooting the cuttings using certain methods, they don't have much, if any light, and sometimes the stems have to push through some soil. This results in some peculiar growth patterns, like fat, stubby, light colored stems with tiny leaves and tips that turn brown. The cuttings that are started in cups with upper stems (covered with parafilm) exposed to air and light don't have this problem. Should I be concerned?

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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #21 
Those fabric pots are looking more promising... I'll think about it.


Any more comments?




What would be good sizes to start with?

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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
hoosierbanana

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Reply with quote  #22 
The design here is easy to make, trying it for the first time this year for small containers. An 8"x18" piece makes a container that is about 3 qts. filled to the brim and 12 fit neatly into a standard flower crate. I cut 8" off the whole roll then 18" strips from that, only double stitch the top with no rolled rim and don't worry much about getting the bottom folds exact, just straight and even with each other so it goes pretty fast.


p.s. I have hundreds of used 1 gallon containers but really prefer fabric for the root structure they make and less chance of overwatering. 

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7a, DE "While you were hanging yourself on someone else's words. Dying to believe in what you heard. I was staring straight into the shining sun"
timclymer

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Reply with quote  #23 
I saw this thread mentions the method I use so I thought I'd chime in (thanks @drivewayfarmer). I don't sanitize my cuttings in bleach and don't have any mold/fungus problems. I use ProMix BX because it's the most readily available here, drains well (but still holds some moisture), and is inexpensive. I can fill about 120 4x4x9" pots will a 3.8cu ft bale, costing me less than $25. I use the pots from Stuewe as they seem to be durable and I like that they're deep. Only downside with them is the shipping fees that seem to amount to an extra 1/3rd of the overall cost.

When potting up I use Root Pouch 3 gallon pots. I'm really liking the rootballs they produce and they're fairly economical, though the kind I get is only good for about 1 growing season. They do dry out quickly though and need more watering when in storage. Not sure about using Root Pouches long term as I've been having some troubles with the handles on the larger pots (15 gallon and up).

Hope that helps, and good luck!

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South Central PA (6b,7a)
Want List: Ital 258, any figs found growing in PA, NJ, or NY
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #24 
What about burlap? 

I may end up getting plastic pots anyway, but I'm interested in testing the fabric pot idea. I'd like to make the order by today or tomorrow. A.M. Leonard seems to be offering free shipping till tomorrow.

Is it better to start with 1 gal. and then move up to 3 gal? Why not go straight to the bigger pot? Would that be cheaper in the long run, especially if I'm not interested that much in resale?

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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #25 
I just bought over $115 worth of pots, including 1 trade gallon and 3 full gallon plastic and 1 trade gallon fabric pots. The 1 gal pots come in a 135 piece pack and the 3 gal pots in a 90 piece pack. The fabric pots are in a 50 pack. Part of the reason I went ahead and got the bigger pots was due to free shipping ;)

I'm still concerned about spending so much money on pots, but when you look at how much each individual pot costs, it's not that bad...

275 pots for $115... Less than $0.42 per pot. Around $0.22  each for the small ones. You can't buy 'em used for that price, can you?

http://www.amleo.com/haviland-high-performance-series-thermoformed-hdpe/p/VP-HHP/

http://www.amleo.com/root-pouch-degradable-pots/p/VP-RPXXXX/


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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #26 
Any comments? Is it a good choice?

And why do they use that material, whatever it is? Why don't they use burlap?

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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
hoosierbanana

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Reply with quote  #27 
Burlap will decompose when wet really fast. The rootpouches are made from a couple different materials and thicknesses that last various amounts of time, they photodegrade mostly. 

The landscape fabric in the video is spun bonded poly, most reusable shopping bags are made from it also but may not have as much UV resistance as the black landscape fabric.

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7a, DE "While you were hanging yourself on someone else's words. Dying to believe in what you heard. I was staring straight into the shining sun"
cheapnewb

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Reply with quote  #28 
How long does it generally take before you need the 3 gal pots?
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Mountainous Southwestern Virginia Zone 6b. Current collection: Olympian, Celeste, Lattarula, and an unknown fig.
Wish List: Popular and Cold-Hardy figs especially.
timclymer

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Reply with quote  #29 
When starting figs in my basement in the winter (January/February), they're usually ready to be repotted in June. I pot up from a 4x4x9 treepot directly to a 3 gallon.
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South Central PA (6b,7a)
Want List: Ital 258, any figs found growing in PA, NJ, or NY
sdpops

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Reply with quote  #30 
For potting soil I keep my eyes open at the big box stores for broken bags of potting soil. As long as they are not pre fertilized I can get them for 50% off to totally free. I dump them in my wheel barrow and add perilite at about 20-25%. Then I bag it up for when I need it, whether it be for potting cuttings or starting/refreshing raised beds.
Once cuttings have rooted I plant them in 1 gallon pots I get free from my local nursery. Usually, here in Yuma, AZ I can transfer from 1 gallon pots to the ground in 2 months time. That's 4-6 weeks establishing in large plastic tubs and about 2 weeks of hardening off. This year I have started "groves", multiple plantings in a small area for some friends and am doing a 4 plant one for myself. I got the idea of "groves" from a Yuma area stand of old fig trees that have grown together beautifully. I posted pics of this grove earlier this year. 
sdpops Yuma,AZ zone 10
carbonfx

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Reply with quote  #31 
Have been unfortunate in the past with using soil from some big box stores. luckily found this site with its unlimited amount of resources! going to try much larger pot this year 10 Gallon, plastic.
Use this soil mix for my two mature trees:
5 - parts sifted Pine Bark Mulch 1/2" mesh
1 - part Peat Moss
1 - part Perlite
Plus - 1 cup Dolemite Limestone and 1 cup Espoma Plant-Tone OR Osmocote per 5 gallon of mix.

Looking for a very productive year!!

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Trenton, NJ - Zone 6b
Current Trees -- San Pietro (Morle); White Triana (Morle)
Interested in -- Truly Delicious Fig that grows in HZ-6b. (open to suggestions) - Figo Preto possibly.
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