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nullzero

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Reply with quote  #1 
There is a local park (Harbor Park) nearby that has over 100 fig trees growing rampant through it. There is a large amount of wild life that distributes the fruit very well. The location is surrounded by urban areas, most likely farm or backyard fig trees were the source of the original seedlings. The park is located off the 110 freeway near San Pedro
https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll=33.787102,-118.289495&spn=0.016585,0.020685&t=h&z=15

I want to trial the fruit, but I will have to fight the wild life for them.... If they are any good they will disappear quickly. I hope everyone enjoys.

Here are the pictures;

Tree#1



Tree #2




Tree#3




Tree#4



Tree#5
Dan796

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Reply with quote  #2 
Awesome pics, I wish that was happening here where I live.
I'll be lucky to find anything at Lowe's besides a BT or a HC.
And that's pretty slim pick'ns if you ask me!
How depressing...... :(

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Dan~ WV zone 5-6
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dkirtexas

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Reply with quote  #3 
THAT IS ABSOLUTLY AWESOME!!!
It is so unique, I would love to have a cutting from that grove.

Danny K
Marshall Tx

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Thx, glad to be here

Danny K "EL CAZADOR DE HIGO"
Waskom Tx Zone 7B/8

Wish list: anything anyone wants me to have. LSU RED.  Any LSU fig.
BLB

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Reply with quote  #4 
Very cool that you live near this grove. I'll bet it's a popular place when the figs are ripening. 
nullzero

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Reply with quote  #5 
The area is not the best, the park has a lot of homeless living in it. So I am sure they enjoy the figs, as well as the migrant workers which wait for work at the edges of the park. The animals get the most of the bounty I would assume. Possums, racoons, squirrels, rats, feral cats, and birds are all over.
landscapewitch

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Reply with quote  #6 
All kinds of wildlife! I was in SoCal last summer and would have had a wreck were I driving from swiveling my head to look at all the figs growing under overpasses, in cracks in the pavement and everywhere! What a place!
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Alexis
Manor, Tx 8b


Wish list - Yellow Neches, Persian White, Dalmatie, Berbera
DesertDance

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Reply with quote  #7 
OK, now that you made us all jealous, go over there this winter, and take about 1500 cuttings.  We will be happy to pay shipping :-)))
Suzi

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Zone 9b, Southern California. "First year they sleep, Second year they creep, Third year they leap!"  Wish List:  I wish all of you happy fig collecting!  My wishes have been fulfilled!
jenniferarino83

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Reply with quote  #8 
I'm with Suzi! Lol hahahahah 

Unknowns!!!! I love it

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nullzero

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Reply with quote  #9 
I don't mind taking cuttings and shipping them out. As long as everyone is willing to trial them and keep us updated on the quality of fruit and growth habit. From the looks of it, some of these figs were very prolific. Tree #4 was in a mostly shaded area and was producing large figs like crazy.

These fig trees were the easy to access ones, which I would most likely take some cuttings of.
stefpix

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Reply with quote  #10 
If these grew from seeds wouldn't many need a pollinator wasp and many others would be male caprifigs?
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nullzero

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Reply with quote  #11 
True many of these must be caprifigs. Its not a problem for fruit in Southern, CA because the wasps are naturalized now. I guess I should open up some of the green figs and see whats inside.
Rob

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Reply with quote  #12 
I think the thing to do is taste them and take cuttings from the ones that are yummy.  Then send these out to the fig community.  Many of them may taste like crap.  With all the good known varieties out there, I wouldn't want to spend time growing a fig of totally unknown quality.
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Rob
Maryland Zone 7
http://rbfigs.webs.com/




landscapewitch

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Reply with quote  #13 
Heresy here, perhaps -  http://www.docstoc.com/docs/47005727/Invasive-fig-trees-(Ficus-carica)-in-the-riparian-forests-of-Californias-Central-Valley-Population-growth-community-impacts-and-eradication-efforts
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Alexis
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Wish list - Yellow Neches, Persian White, Dalmatie, Berbera
rcantor

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Reply with quote  #14 
Good point but not an issue for most of us  :)
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Zone 6, MO

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Martineca Rimada, Galicia Negra, Fioroni Ruvo, De La Reina - Pons, Tauro, BFF, Sefrawi, Sbayi, Mavra Sika , Fillaciano Bianco, Corynth, Souadi, Acciano Purple, LSU Tiger, LSU Red, Cajun Gold, BB-10 any great tasting fig
nullzero

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Reply with quote  #15 
Did not get a chance to taste figs from last year (due to timing and disappearing from animals). Anyway sometime in the next 3 weeks (during a weekend). I would like to go out to the fig forest and take cuttings before they emerge. I remember where the trees are and have photos to ID what I remember.

I would like to see if others in SoCal near Carson, CA would want to join to take cuttings and ID the trees. The trees would then be visited this summer to bag and taste the ripe fruit. We could then judge the taste of the figs and decide which ones of the cuttings are worth keeping.
nullzero

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Reply with quote  #16 
Who is interested in fig cuttings from these trees? Me and another fig4fun member are going to collect cuttings of the trees this weekend. Need to get an idea of who is interested. I was initially going to take about 20 cuttings from about 7-10 trees. Trees that have figs on it now will be skipped over (because I believe these would be carp figs).

Anyway was going to tag and ID the trees, and come back in the summer. Taste test on the selected fig trees would be taken. It would then be updated on this thread in the summer time. From what I have seen, most of these fig trees are large green type. These are all wild seed germinated fig trees, so a good tree can be out there.
dkirtexas

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Reply with quote  #17 
PM being sent
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Thx, glad to be here

Danny K "EL CAZADOR DE HIGO"
Waskom Tx Zone 7B/8

Wish list: anything anyone wants me to have. LSU RED.  Any LSU fig.
genecolin

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Reply with quote  #18 
PM sent.
"gene"

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From the bayou,
"gene"

zone 9
Houma, La.
paulandirene

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Reply with quote  #19 

WOW, that's really close to my favorite food shop the LA area: La Española Meats

http://www.laespanolameats.com

33.796909,-118.291483

They make their own Spanish-styled chorizos and other cured meat products [husband is from Ohio, wife is from Valencia, Spain]

"For an aficionado of Spain’s cured meats, chorizo Bilbao, Butifarra Catalana, chorizo Pamplona, chorizo Cantimpalo, chorizo Soria, Salchichón de Vic, Sobrasada Mallorquina, Morcillas de Arroz, Morcillas de Cebolla, jamón Serrano, Lomo Embuchado, and much more can all be found at La Española Meats. As U.S. restrictions on the importation of meats have softened, the company has been selling Redondo Iglesias Jamón Serrano, Fermin Jamón Iberico and 5J Jamón Iberico de Bellota. The famed Black Hoofed Pig."

Yes, I know that's a shameless plug for a non-fig related business, but since several of you have Spanish spouses, and others of you just like Spanish cuisine....you might like to know about it [Our friend from Jerez loves this place]

twobrothersgarden

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Reply with quote  #20 
Nice Pictures. Thanks for sharing.
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Henry, Brawley California

LaFigue

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Reply with quote  #21 


Yes, plant invasion can be a concern and given the right environmental conditions can change a local plant community. See the following research.

Pattern and Process of Fig (Ficus carica) Invasion in a California Riparian Forest

Katherine A. Holmes, Steven E. Greco, and Alison M. Berry

Invasive Plant Science and Management January-March 2014 : Vol. 7, Issue 1, pg(s) 46- 58 https://doi.org/10.1614/IPSM-

Abstract

The common edible fig is a subcanopy tree that has invaded many of the remnant riparian forests of California's Central Valley. Fig is unusual in its ability to invade low-light, low-disturbance, native-plant–dominated environments. Dendrochronology combined with regression and spatial analyses allowed us to empirically quantify the expansion rate and spatial pattern of the fig invasion into the native plant community at Caswell Memorial State Park (Ripon, CA) over a 70-year invasion period. Fig uses a combination of short-distance dispersal, which results in constant, linear expansion at source population sites and long-distance dispersal, which eventually leads to high recruitment of satellite populations in ideal environments. Although fig initially experienced a long lag in its invasion rate, at the time of this study, it was expanding at an exponential rate at the landscape scale in Caswell. We identified a number of characteristics intrinsic to the fig population (shade suppression, pollinator presence, highly specialized reproduction, and propagule pressure) as well as extrinsic characteristics of the receiving environment (hydrologic alteration from the construction of a dam, safe sites for juvenile recruitment, and target effects from environmental heterogeneity) that may have influenced the rate and pattern of fig invasion. The Central Valley riparian forests have been reduced to less than 6% of their original area, and invasive fig is a significant threat to the remaining fragments of this important vegetation community. We include suggestions for fig eradication based on knowledge gained in this study.

Marcel

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Zone 4b, St. Paul, MN
Wish list: Grantham's Royal, Florea, Laradek's EBT, Longue d'Août, Randino, Valleiry
JoshHolbrook

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Reply with quote  #22 
Invasive Figs... If only we could trade them for the Kudzu, Brazilian Pepper and Melaleuca we have in the southeast...
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...Fig-growing, Professing at Montreat College - Chasing reptiles and amphibians in the meantime...
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