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Elruge

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Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #1 
I tried a breba from my white marseilles aka. lattarula yesterday which went great with a salad and for some reason it started me thinking firstly back to the history of this particular tree and from that if I could keep only one of my figs,all container grown, which would it be. My white marseilles is a cutting from a tree bought in the early 1980s from the famous old nursery Thomas Rivers of Sawbridgeworth, responsible for the breeding of many different varieties of fruit trees and which ironically closed later in the 1980s after some 250 years of trading. My original tree was planted in ground at my previous house and by the time we moved in the 1990s to our current house it was much too big to move, hence the cutting.
Now I have 15 fig trees in total, 11 different varieties, and I think if I could keep only the one it would be my white marseilles. Some of my other figs may have a more intense taste, but taste is anyway a very individual thing and I think the white marseilles has a nice light sweet flavour.
The reasons for my choice are
Nostalgia. As my first fig it holds that special place.
Reliability. It gives a good crop twice a year every year.
Freedom from pests. Growing in a greenhouse some of my other figs get scale insect but never the white marseilles.
Taste. My wife and I, and the neighbours like it.
It would be great to hear about other aficianados favourites.
Here are a couple of photos taken yesterday of the white marseilles.




Attached Images
jpeg IMG_20170617_113643.jpg (122.63 KB, 80 views)
jpeg _20170618_101755.JPG (366.82 KB, 73 views)


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John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.

panfishman

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Reply with quote  #2 
i have a young st.anthony ,but haven't got any to eat yet from it yet here. where i am out of 22 diff. varieties my 2 year old Florea has given me ripe figs 2 weeks ago now,so florea wins now, but  it was Letezia but she's moves to second top choice now~zone 6b in pa.~
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bluegill sw,pa. zone 6
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #3 
Mine would be Hardy Chicago.  The cuttings came from a friend and I learned a lot growing them out.  My first fig came from one of the trees, which to me tasted very good.  I've got one plant that's a year and two weeks old 5-6 feet tall in tree form with a bunch of fruit forming on it.  That is my keeper. 
Number 2 would be a two-year-old Hardy Chicago trained as an espalier with tiny fruit forming now.  Yeah, I know you said single tree but she deserves an honorable mention ;-)

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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific, Lattarula, Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady,  Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Sucrette, Scott's Black, Large Negronne, Croatian, Raspberry Latte, Alma, Longue D'Aout, Pel de Bou, Lloral, Black Triana, Tarantella, Dominick's, Sweet Diana, Bronx Italian Purple, Ciccio Nero, Ronde de Bordeaux (gifted - thank you),  Panache (gifted - thank you) Lyon France (gifted - thank you).

~~~The Addiction is Real~~~
JMRTSUS

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Posts: 116
Reply with quote  #4 
Celeste

Comfort food as I grew up with Celeste trees in New Orleans.

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Ooltewah, TN (SE TN) Zone 7a


LSU figs.....Purple, Gold, Tiger, Champagne, O'Rourke, and Scott's Black. (GEAUX TIGERS!)


 Brown Turkey, Black Jack, Black Italian, Brandy, Celeste, Condradia, Chicago Hardy, Dalmatie, Desert King, Ischia Green, Italian Black, Kadota, Lil Miss Figgie, Lil Ruby, Olympian, Black Bethlehem, Panache, Jelly, Petite Negra, Raspberry Latte, Siblawi, Texas Everbearing, Violette de Bordeaux, White Marseille.  And very rare, top secret "unknowns" AKA as Lost tags! Plus many vaguely described figs such as "Louisiana Brown", "NOLA Irish Bayou" and  "LA Yellow", "Unk Purple" " Teramo unk"and on and on (I love unknowns).
GeneDaniels

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Posts: 1,042
Reply with quote  #5 
I second Hardy Chicago, if I could have only one. Last year when we had tons of rain at harvest, all the other figs split and soured, but not the HC. Also, even on the hard winter when it froze to the ground, it came back and produced a small crop that year. Besides all that, it is one of the best tasting in my yard. Its a winner! 
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Zone 7b (Central Arkansas) Trees in the ground: Hardy Chicago, Celeste(?), Italian Black, Sicilian, Strawberry Verte, and Unk yellow.  Tree in pots: CdD
Chapman

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Reply with quote  #6 
I would have to keep my Celeste. 
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South Louisiana, Zone 9a
Jsavkov

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elruge
I tried a breba from my white marseilles aka. lattarula yesterday which went great with a salad and for some reason it started me thinking firstly back to the history of this particular tree and from that if I could keep only one of my figs,all container grown, which would it be. My white marseilles is a cutting from a tree bought in the early 1980s from the famous old nursery Thomas Rivers of Sawbridgeworth, responsible for the breeding of many different varieties of fruit trees and which ironically closed later in the 1980s after some 250 years of trading. My original tree was planted in ground at my previous house and by the time we moved in the 1990s to our current house it was much too big to move, hence the cutting.
Now I have 15 fig trees in total, 11 different varieties, and I think if I could keep only the one it would be my white marseilles. Some of my other figs may have a more intense taste, but taste is anyway a very individual thing and I think the white marseilles has a nice light sweet flavour.
The reasons for my choice are
Nostalgia. As my first fig it holds that special place.
Reliability. It gives a good crop twice a year every year.
Freedom from pests. Growing in a greenhouse some of my other figs get scale insect but never the white marseilles.
Taste. My wife and I, and the neighbours like it.
It would be great to hear about other aficianados favourites.
Here are a couple of photos taken yesterday of the white marseilles.


Hands down I'd take my Angelo's Dark! And Smith, for me it's all about taste! And taste alone!


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Growing: Black Madeira, Figo Preto, Galicia Negra, Angelo's Dark, Col de Dame Gris, Col de Dama Roja, Panache, I-258, Socorro Black, Corynth, Pink Jerusalem, Scarlett Unknown, Smith, Nero 600M, Violette de Sollies, Malta Black35, Gino's, Osborne Prolific, Negronne, Ronde de Bordeaux, Green Ischia, JH Adriatic, Green Jordan, Longue d'Aout, Black Zadar, English Brown Turkey, Kathleen Black, Mulberry Street Unknown..... if you see anything I have that you like or want let me know and maybe we can work out a trade or something else!
Tonycm

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Reply with quote  #8 
Valle Negra is my girl. She's very productive giving me two crops. The figs rank high on my flavor list too. All around good tree to have.
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Zone 6a Sarver, PA 
Elruge

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Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #9 
It's great to see to see the different reasons for everyone's choice.
Hardy Chicago and Celeste seem to be popular. These are two figs that you don't really find in the UK. We are currently having the hottest June weather for many years. This is good and bad, it ripens the figs nicely, but too many breba ripen together. Still got quite a few white marseilles to come and the heat is causing my brown turkey brebas to swell up now. Oh well there's always the neighbours and the fridge for the surplus.

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John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.
Jodi

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Reply with quote  #10 
I love to see these "favorites" posts.  Looking forward to some zone 8 posts.  My trees are all too little to say yet.  Looking forward to the day when I have tons of figs and can rank them.  Happy figging everyone!
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In the book the "The Meaning of Trees" it is said the fig regulates the heart and that the true essence of Figs is...food for the soul. 
Wishes for Martinenca Rimada, Black Ischia, I258, CddRoja, Jolly Tiger, Your favorite Figgy!
Zone 8a Camp Verde AZ 
Brad

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Reply with quote  #11 
Tonycm are your figs in ground or in containers?

Thanks,

Brad

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Missouri, Zone 6a
susieqz

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Reply with quote  #12 
el, you might look for mongibello.
in  sicily, that's the correct name for hardy chicago.

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susie,
burner of trees
 
 
noss

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Reply with quote  #13 
I would have to say both the Celeste and the Southern Brown Turkey, as both are delicious and versatile.  I prefer the Southern Brown Turkey for fresh eating, but both are very good.

noss

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noss/a.k.a. Vivian Lafayette, LA Zone 9a Wish List:  Col de Dame Noir, Scott's Yellow, Tony's Brown Italian.
Tonycm

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Reply with quote  #14 
Brad, Most of my trees are potted, including Valle Negra. I have 12 trees planted in ground with varying results. I'll be planting a Valle Negra in ground to trial it, with hopes of a good outcome since it comes from the foothills of the Alps.
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Zone 6a Sarver, PA 
mgginva

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Reply with quote  #15 
Battaglia Green
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Michael in Virginia (zone 7a) Wish list: Tiberio, Campera, Calabacita, Cuello Dama Blanca
Jbidlack

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Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by susieqz
el, you might look for mongibello.
in  sicily, that's the correct name for hardy chicago.


Thank you for the original name. I often wondered what it actually was. I only new it was a mt etna type.
Figgysid1

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Reply with quote  #17 
Figo Preto.

1. Produces 2 main crops a year. (Hawaii)
2. The most productive variety out of 60 so far.
3. Average size main crop fruit of 80 grams.
4. Best looks.
5. Best tasting.
6. Healthy/Vigorous growing.
7. Flavor is consistent.
8. Does not need to be picked dead ripe to be good.

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(Zone 12a) Big Island, Hawaii, 2,400 ft elevation, Fern Forest. Avg. July High 77,Avg.Jan.Low 56 Precipitation days 290, annual rainfall 201.80 inches.
Frankallen

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Reply with quote  #18 
Strawberry Verte....................YUM YUM!! : )
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Frank from BamaZone 7-b Alabama

....................................................

"Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever".

Mahatma Gandhi




paully22

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Reply with quote  #19 
If it is inground, it would be Granthams Royal. If it is pot culture, it will be either Florea
Or LSU Improved. Preference based on reliability, hardiness, good taste & productivity
For my zone.
Jsavkov

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Reply with quote  #20 
As of right now it would have to be the one I don't like to share! lol Angelo's Dark, but that may change after I try Figo preto, black Madeira, or smith this season! We will see, if I start giving all my AD to my 2 year old so I can eat all the figs from those mentioned above, and find myself not sharing any of those varieties! But until then it's got to be Angelo's Dark!
__________________
Growing: Black Madeira, Figo Preto, Galicia Negra, Angelo's Dark, Col de Dame Gris, Col de Dama Roja, Panache, I-258, Socorro Black, Corynth, Pink Jerusalem, Scarlett Unknown, Smith, Nero 600M, Violette de Sollies, Malta Black35, Gino's, Osborne Prolific, Negronne, Ronde de Bordeaux, Green Ischia, JH Adriatic, Green Jordan, Longue d'Aout, Black Zadar, English Brown Turkey, Kathleen Black, Mulberry Street Unknown..... if you see anything I have that you like or want let me know and maybe we can work out a trade or something else!
Elruge

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Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #21 
Still getting brebas from my white marseilles, so that's still tops on productivity and that plus its greenhouse pest resistance and suitability for container culture keeps it just ahead but I have to admit if it was on taste alone as some posters have chosen, some of my berry flavoured figs like ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, verte and petite negri would beat it.
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John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.
noss

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Reply with quote  #22 
Hi John,

How is it that the White Marseilles is greenhouse pest resistant?  What kind of pests would be a problem in a greenhouse?

Thanks,

noss

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noss/a.k.a. Vivian Lafayette, LA Zone 9a Wish List:  Col de Dame Noir, Scott's Yellow, Tony's Brown Italian.
Elruge

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Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #23 
Hi Noss

Good question. The pests I see in my greenhouse are red spider and scale insect. My figs don't usually get the spider, my peaches are more susceptible, but they are prone to scale.
My white marseilles never suffers. This might not be entirely variety related as it is also my oldest fig and my verte which is my second oldest also seems scale free.
It may be that as my other figs age they will also become scale resistant. If that does happen then my single fig choice could change.

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John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.
MyDogMike

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Posts: 141
Reply with quote  #24 
I have an Italian Unknown that came from my great-grandfather's house.  No idea what it is but it's cold hardy and as kill-proof a fig as any other variety that I've come across, so I'd keep that one. 
jdsfrance

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Reply with quote  #25 
One guy wrote: 'the best fig is the one currently in my mouth'.
So, the tree I'll keep would be the one producing that fig !
 I have some unknowns and "healthy longue d'aout". Since it will be easier for everyone to find and try it, I'd say healthy longue d'aout.
Dalmatie is good too, but since I had to choose just one ...

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------------------------
Climate from -25°C to + 35°C
Only cold hardy figtrees can make it here
noss

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Reply with quote  #26 
Thanks John,

I'd like to hope that older trees can fight off scale, as it's pesky to deal with.  I've only had a problem with hard scale that looks like tiny reddish-brown barnacles and that can be harder to get rid of.  I use alcohol to spray on the trees, then spray them with an insecticidal soap with, or without pyrethrin in it.

noss

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noss/a.k.a. Vivian Lafayette, LA Zone 9a Wish List:  Col de Dame Noir, Scott's Yellow, Tony's Brown Italian.
Stormy

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Reply with quote  #27 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elruge
Hi Noss Good question. The pests I see in my greenhouse are red spider and scale insect. My figs don't usually get the spider, my peaches are more susceptible, but they are prone to scale. My white marseilles never suffers. This might not be entirely variety related as it is also my oldest fig and my verte which is my second oldest also seems scale free. It may be that as my other figs age they will also become scale resistant. If that does happen then my single fig choice could change.

I have the same set up, plants in pots inside my greenhouse and on most of the varieties I have scale bugs as well. I noticed that when you see ants on the branches or leaves, you will discover some scale bugs when looking attentively.
Elruge, do you act against the bugs or do you just leave them as they are?

My favorite so far is the Cendrosa (at least I think that's what it is), it ripens very late, starting Sep but goes on until sometimes end of Nov, weather permitting. The taste is very good, good size as well, not very handsome but who cares?
My Negronne gave me one breba, but it is still very young, we will see later on when the main crop ripens. I still have the Madeleine as well, with lots of main crop figs getting huge by now. But I haven't tasted one before and all the brebas fell off.
I also have a honey type fig which resembles a white Marseille but it will at best produce 10 brebas, so I don't think it is one. The main crop though is very good as well, very sweet, small size, about 40g.

Are your figs growing in pots inside your greenhouse? We have a similar climate, so we might share experiences here?
 


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Stormy

Elruge

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Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #28 
Stormy, I do act against the scale. I am reluctant to use chemicals, so I use regular inspection followed by any manual action necessary. I crush the scale using thumb and finger being as careful as I can not to tear the leaf. This process is quite therapeutic but can be a bit time consuming. It works for me. It helps that pot culture keeps my figs small so fewer leaves to check.
Relating to ants, they are regular visitors to the greenhouse but since I put pot feet under all my pots I have not seen any climbing up the pots to get at my plants. In previous years before the pot feet this was not the case.

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John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.
noss

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Reply with quote  #29 
The ants are the worst offenders when you have aphids, or scale, or mealybugs because they "farm" them, encouraging them to prosper so the ants can eat the honeydew from them.  Keeping the ants killed off will aid in getting rid of the scale and other pests.

It's the tiny "sugar ants" we have here who are the worst offenders of all and they may have done in one of my Key Lime trees.  I had to cut it down quite a way to try and save it and there are several sap runs that I'm worried are borers, but I don't know how to tell about that.  Other than that, there are all new sprouts that look healthy, which are coming from right above the graft line to about a foot above it.  I'm hoping the tree is saved, but am concerned about the sap runs.

noss

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noss/a.k.a. Vivian Lafayette, LA Zone 9a Wish List:  Col de Dame Noir, Scott's Yellow, Tony's Brown Italian.
Stormy

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elruge
Stormy, I do act against the scale. I am reluctant to use chemicals, so I use regular inspection followed by any manual action necessary. I crush the scale using thumb and finger being as careful as I can not to tear the leaf. This process is quite therapeutic but can be a bit time consuming. It works for me. It helps that pot culture keeps my figs small so fewer leaves to check. Relating to ants, they are regular visitors to the greenhouse but since I put pot feet under all my pots I have not seen any climbing up the pots to get at my plants. In previous years before the pot feet this was not the case.

First time this year I wrapped glue paper around the trunks of the biggest plants to keep the ants away. It works great, provided there is no other contact between the plant and the ground off course, like with sticks or a wall for instance.

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Stormy

Elruge

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Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #31 
What's glue paper, that's not tree grease is it?
I have used tree grease on some in ground fruit trees and ended up over the following weeks, as I forgot it was there, regularly getting it on my clothes. It's really difficult stuff to clean off, impossible to get rid of the black marks completely. After that I decided not to use it any more.
So is glue paper something different?

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John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.
Elruge

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Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #32 
Noss, hope your key lime recovers. It's not a tree that what do well in my climate. Not enough sun and heat in the summer and although it would probably survive the relatively mild winters it would I am sure lose its leaves.
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John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.
Vinny2210

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Reply with quote  #33 

Hey John, Spray your greenhouse trees with sb invigorator. It feeds your plants also. Great stuff and you'll never see a bug.


41gK4OaDpLL.jpg 


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Vinny

Bognor Regis, United Kingdom

Wish List : None
My Ebay: http://www.ebay.co.uk/myb/Summary?
Contact me on My Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/630420053750386/

noss

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Reply with quote  #34 
John,

What are pot feet?  Do you have any photos, or can you let me know a link to them so I may go see them?

Thanks,

noss

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noss/a.k.a. Vivian Lafayette, LA Zone 9a Wish List:  Col de Dame Noir, Scott's Yellow, Tony's Brown Italian.
Elruge

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Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #35 
Hi Vinny, I've got some of that stuff and have used it in the fruit cage. You reckon it's good in the greenhouse as well. Would you use it at the normal application strength for plants under glass.
__________________
John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.
Elruge

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Posts: 169
Reply with quote  #36 
Noss,
They are just small manufactured pieces of clay or plastic designed to be placed under a pot to raise it slightly off of the ground, primarily for drainage. If you Google images "pot feet" all will be revealed.

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John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.
noss

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Posts: 880
Reply with quote  #37 
Thanks John.  I'll go look for pot feet, then.  I'd like to get some of those to raise the pots a little off the ground.

Sounds like a good thing to me.

noss

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noss/a.k.a. Vivian Lafayette, LA Zone 9a Wish List:  Col de Dame Noir, Scott's Yellow, Tony's Brown Italian.
VeryNew2Figs

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Posts: 401
Reply with quote  #38 
Pot Risers PRB2-12 Indoor and Outdoor Potriser Bulk-Pack, 12-Count$24.95 at Walmart

( https://www.walmart.com/ip/Pot-Risers-PRB2-12-Indoor-and-Outdoor-Potriser-Bulk-Pack-12-Count/55542158?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&adid=22222222227075238291&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=&wl1=s&wl2=c&wl3=188301846474&wl4=aud-310687322322:pla-293859918476&wl5=9021724&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=online&wl12=55542158&wl13=&veh=sem )


DIY garden decorations and pot feet made with cement and soap molds: 80 lb bag of motor mix $4.00.  Soap/candy mold app $4.00.
( http://www.gardengatenotes.com/2010/01/12/make-your-own-pot-feet/ )

Just sayin'



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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific, Lattarula, Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady,  Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Sucrette, Scott's Black, Large Negronne, Croatian, Raspberry Latte, Alma, Longue D'Aout, Pel de Bou, Lloral, Black Triana, Tarantella, Dominick's, Sweet Diana, Bronx Italian Purple, Ciccio Nero, Ronde de Bordeaux (gifted - thank you),  Panache (gifted - thank you) Lyon France (gifted - thank you).

~~~The Addiction is Real~~~
schang

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Posts: 112
Reply with quote  #39 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elruge
Stormy, I do act against the scale. I am reluctant to use chemicals, so I use regular inspection followed by any manual action necessary. I crush the scale using thumb and finger being as careful as I can not to tear the leaf. This process is quite therapeutic but can be a bit time consuming. It works for me. It helps that pot culture keeps my figs small so fewer leaves to check. Relating to ants, they are regular visitors to the greenhouse but since I put pot feet under all my pots I have not seen any climbing up the pots to get at my plants. In previous years before the pot feet this was not the case.


Hi, john:  How can pot feet help to prevent ants from getting up to the plants for honey dew?

I like the words you use, "manual", "therapeutic", to eradicate scales, aphids, and mealy bugs. I tend to use direct, far less elegant descriptions on them: squeeze, pinch, and crush, and sometimes with #$@% curse words. :-)  To some extent, it does have certain therapeutic effect, but not if one has to do it every day for three weeks...As a matter of fact, I am still doing it for my Satsuma orange tree, after I was out of the country for 6 weeks during this spring.  These bugs exploded on the tree branches and leaves.  Neem oil is supposed to help but not as effective in my case.  Happy gardening.

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schang from Columbia, SC Zone 8
mjc

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Reply with quote  #40 
A very effective control for aphids, mealybugs and other 'suckers' is a simple soap solution.

Almost any real soap can be used, (soap, not detergents) but you don't need moisturizers, scents and so on, so that will limit your soap choices when dealing with bar soarps.  But it has been shown that potassium based soaps are even more effective than sodium (Potassium hydroxide lye as opposed to sodium hydroxide lye used to make the soap), which generally means a liquid soap...liquid castile soaps and Murphy's Oil soap fall in that category.

Mix 1 TBS of the soap (liquid...if bar soap, it needs to be liquified first) per quart of clean water in a spray bottle and cover the bugs well.  Test a small leaf first, as some plants are more sensitive and can suffer from leaf burn.

Also, a strong jet of water can be used to wash minor infestations away.
Stormy

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Reply with quote  #41 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elruge
What's glue paper, that's not tree grease is it? I have used tree grease on some in ground fruit trees and ended up over the following weeks, as I forgot it was there, regularly getting it on my clothes. It's really difficult stuff to clean off, impossible to get rid of the black marks completely. After that I decided not to use it any more. So is glue paper something different?

It is green paper covered in glue at one side, so you wrap it around the trunk base and fix it with cord. Any ant or other bug trying to climb the trunk will be stuck.

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Stormy

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Reply with quote  #42 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elruge
What's glue paper, that's not tree grease is it? I have used tree grease on some in ground fruit trees and ended up over the following weeks, as I forgot it was there, regularly getting it on my clothes. It's really difficult stuff to clean off, impossible to get rid of the black marks completely. After that I decided not to use it any more. So is glue paper something different?

glue paper.jpg 


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Stormy

Elruge

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Reply with quote  #43 
Thanks Stormy, I can get glue bands in the UK and might try them if ants become a problem.
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John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.
Elruge

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Reply with quote  #44 
Schang, I am not recommending pot feet as a protection against ants and I am sorry if I gave that impression. I was making an observation that since I have started using them for my greenhouse pots I have only seen them on the floor not on my plants. I bought the pot feet as a drainage aid not as an ant deterrent. It's completely possible that the ant scouts just haven't discovered my pots are off the floor now.

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John
South coast UK
Hardiness zone 9, Heat zone  2 or 3 in a good summer (greenhouse makes all the difference to varieties I can ripen)
Growing white marseilles, col de dame blanc, noire de caromb, madeleine des deux saisons, pingo de mel, brown turkey, ronde de bordeaux, rouge de bordeaux, petite negri, sucre vert and sultane.
AltadenaMara

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Reply with quote  #45 

I would second Figgysid1’s vote for Figo Preto/Black Madeira. It’s a heavy bearer with large, delicious fruit that are always the 10 standard in flavor. Mine isn’t as vigorous a grower and likes to branch out rather than up which is fine for pot culture as well as in the ground. It wants to put all its energy into figs rather than growth.

I almost would almost agree with Frankallen about Strawberry Verte except that its brebas were disappointing in taste considering how wonderful the main crop is. No fig tree is perfect but FP/BM and SV come close. 


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Mara  Southern California  Zone 1990= 9b   2012= 10a  2020=?

 

tsparozi

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Reply with quote  #46 
BM / FP it is..... now all I have to do is get them to grow..... get them to grow in quantity and get them to ripen to full maturity..... That is all that I am asking for.... if I plan on 1 good fig from each plant, that means that I have to successfully grow about 25 BM's and 25 FP's..... Can I do it?
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Reply with quote  #47 
Genevese Nero AF
FiggyFrank

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Reply with quote  #48 
Ronde de Bordeaux would be my choice for great, all-around fig.  Ripens sooner than all my other varieties, delicious, and plentiful, although on the smaller side.

Preto has always been my favorite tasting fig and still is.  Just needs some heat.  I've seen figs stay on for 4 months before ripening.  Well worth it though!

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Frank
zone 7a - VA
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Reply with quote  #49 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsparozi
BM / FP it is..... now all I have to do is get them to grow..... get them to grow in quantity and get them to ripen to full maturity..... That is all that I am asking for.... if I plan on 1 good fig from each plant, that means that I have to successfully grow about 25 BM's and 25 FP's..... Can I do it?


I keep multiplying mine, Tony.  I do get ripened Pretos every year but they're usually last.  I have got some as early as September in zone 7.  Mine all grow very well with clusters of figs at a time.  Well...let me explain..  They grow branches and set their figs until around July, then the tree is at a complete stand-still, showing no activity and just sits for months inactive until the figs are ready to ripen.  Well worth the wait.  But as you mentioned, the more trees you grow, the better your chances to indulge.  Good luck my friend.

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Frank
zone 7a - VA
tsparozi

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Reply with quote  #50 
Thank you, Frank! I remain eternally hopeful!....   :-)
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