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AltadenaMara

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Reply with quote  #51 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsparozi
BM / FP it is..... now all I have to do is get them to grow..... get them to grow in quantity and get them to ripen to full maturity..... That is all that I am asking for.... if I plan on 1 good fig from each plant, that means that I have to successfully grow about 25 BM's and 25 FP's..... Can I do it?

For that plan, you might have two major challenges where you live.

  1. BM/FP isn’t the easiest fig to propagate if you want lots of trees. I was a fanatic in 2015 with rooting hormone, temp controlled heating mats, sun lights, the works. I was able to root FP two cuttings from Harvey. I put an air layer on one of my FP, now a second year tree, back in January, and it still doesn’t have adequate roots. All my other air layers from that time are rooted and in pots. I also have a BM that’s grafted, and it’s a slow grower as well.
  2. BM/FP ripens too late in some zones to mature. This video shows what happens in a cold zone to a BM/FP to prepare it for the greenhouse. As you can see in the first minute of the video, you'll get a lot more than one fig per tree:


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Mara  Southern California  Zone 1990= 9b   2012= 10a  2020=?

 

pino

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Reply with quote  #52 
The best fig tree for YOU will of course depend on your growing skills, resources & LOCATION(climate, terroir...). Doubt if the best fig for California will be the best fig for Maine 

After 25 years of growing figs in Zone 6, the black fig that grows best, produces the most & tastes best for me is Ciccio Nero.  My fav black fig!  At this time have many many producing fig trees and Ciccio Nero still produces 80% of my black figs.  Even produces if left unprotected in Zone 6 winters.  This fig should also grow well in wet harvest areas since next to impossible to get it to split.

If I was a white fig lover I would recommend Fico Bianco as best & easiest to grow cool climate producer and for those willing to put a little more growing effort Dalmatie really shines in taste & production.

Also of course in cool climates ALL healthy Mt. Etna type figs do well & have been long time favourites(Hardy Chicago, Marseilles Black, Sal's Gene, ...  I have 12 of them all very nice tasting, productive & easy to grow).  Get a healthy specimen & you can't go wrong.

Many many great tasting runners up that are looking great but after 4 years my jury is still out whether they are consistent producers in cool zone 6 climates;

RdB, Petite Negri, Atreano, Melanzana, Negronne, Peter's Honey, Strawberry Verte, Sicilian Black & Red, Brunswick/Goutte d'or, Drap D'Or, Sucrette, Vine, Yugoslavian black huge, Bianchetta. Pastilliere, LdA, Desert King (if properly san pedro type pruning & extra winter protection), Gisotta Nero, Neveralla, LSU Gold, healthy Celeste, VdB...

Ask me again in a year and my list may change but I know who will retain #1 black fig title.

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Pino, zone 6, Niagara
Wish List: Brogiotto Bianco, Fico Datto, Fiorone di Ruvo, Fracazzano Multicolore, Fiorone Oro, Popone, Rigato del Salento and other multi colour striped figs

Pino's Figs / Pino's Photos; 2017 Brebas / 2017 Main crop

tsparozi

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Reply with quote  #53 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AltadenaMara

For that plan, you might have two major challenges where you live.

  1. BM/FP isn’t the easiest fig to propagate if you want lots of trees. I was a fanatic in 2015 with rooting hormone, temp controlled heating mats, sun lights, the works. I was able to root FP two cuttings from Harvey.

Mara.... I just checked my rooting inventory and my tale of woe for BM cuttings is at 16 cuttings killed.... For FP cuttings, the tally is 8 cuttings killed including cuttings from Frank and Herman... Yeah, my record with rooting those varieties is not very good... I think too much newbie juice was applied to them and all that kindness killed them...  :-)
figgary

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Reply with quote  #54 
So far, 4 years into trying to determine which varieties will consistently produce an abundance of great figs in my zone 9A climate, I would keep the Lampeira Prusch. Both crops are fantastic here. My 2nd choice would be Italian 258.

Lampeira Prusch brebas in 3rd week of July
IMG_3825.JPG 
Lampeira Prusch main in September
IMG_3973.JPG 


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Gary in CA 9A  Seeking Peace and figs for all
tsparozi

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Reply with quote  #55 
Both look amazing, Gary.... I am hoping that the Lampeira Prusch that you sent me last September (thank you again) will produce such nice figs in my zone in the future now that I can give it an earlier start this coming spring with the Hoop/Green House........
figgary

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Reply with quote  #56 
I hope that you have good luck with it, Tony. It is a mysterious fig. Not a Lampeira as Lampo knows them in Portugal. I would like to hear how it does outside of California. It is one of the few figs that gets a bit of rust here, so I don't know how it might react in the South. A man that I met at Harvey's fig gathering last Summer, lives in the S. F. Bay Area, and he said that it was also his best fig. So much so, that he was top-working several of his other variety, in-ground trees with it.
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Gary in CA 9A  Seeking Peace and figs for all
tsparozi

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Reply with quote  #57 
Gary, I will certainly let you and the forum know how it does in my zone 6a... I am all full of anticipation!   :-)
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