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nelson20vt

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Reply with quote  #1 

Ok so I have been searching for as many Portuguese Fig Varieties as possible as I plan on Starting a Portuguese Collection. This is the list of Varieties I have found so far I know there is more but this is all I got so far. Some I believe are not of Portuguese Origin but have been grown in Portugal for a long time like the Burjassote. This is what I found so far I will add more as find them.


Algarve - Common fig- Black
Bacorinho, Common Fig - Green with Violet Tint
Badalhouce - Common Fig -
Bêbera - Smyrna Type ? - Black

Bêbera Branca- Common Fig- Pink

Belmandil - Smyrna Type

Branca  do Douro - Common Fig - White

Brinco - Common Type -

Burjassote branca - Common Type - White

Burjassote preta - Common Type - Black

Cachopo,

Carvalhal,

Carigo,  Common Type -

Castanhal- Common Type-

Cótia, Cótio - Common Type - White

Da ponte - Common Type - White

Dois à folha - Common Type -

Dois ao Prato - Common Fig - Black

Douro

Encharia branca - Smyrna Type - White

Encharia preta - Smyrna Type - Black

Lampeira

Lampa branca,

Lampa preta- San Pedro- Violet with green tint towards the neck.

Lanjal

Lopinho - Common Type -

Maia - San Pedro - Green

Marques Loureiro - Common Fig - White

Milheira - Common Type -

Moscatel Branco - Common Fig - White

Moscatel Preto

Olho De Perdiz - Common Fig- Purple With Bright Red Eye

Orjal,

Palmares - Common Type - white

Paraíso - Common Type

Paraíso-Branco - Common Type - White

Pardo - Common Type - Brown

Passanudo- Common Type -

Pedral - Common Type -

Pingo De Mel - Common Type - White

Preto- Common Type- Black

Preto De Torres Novas - Common Type - Black - Used for drying

Princesa - Common Type - White

Rebanguio - Common Type

Real

Rei- Common Type-Dark

Rei Branco - Common Type - White

Reis Restevo - Common Type

Sao João Branco

Sao Luiz,

Sogenha - Common Fig - Black

Três em prato ( Syns.Três ao Prato- Três um Prato) - Smyrna type

Verdeal - Common Type - Green

Urjal (syns. Capa Rôta, Branco) Common Type- Green


 
Varieties From Madeira Island

Bacorinhos
Bêbera - syn. Abebereira
Bêbera Branca
Burro
Branco -Branca
Castanhal
Cótio
Doce
Genovês
Martinho
Mulato
Preto
Rei Branco
 
Varieties From the Azores Islands
need to do more research
 
Capelas
Figo Flores
 

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gorgi

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Reply with quote  #2 
I am NO Portuguese fig expert!

From (the owner is of a Portuguese/Azores descent);
http://www.adrianosfigtrees.com/varieties.html
I found:
Black Portugal
Lampeira
Pingo de Mel #1
Pingo de Mel #2
(Moscatel Branco)

From (the best fig database on earth - ever);
http://figs4fun.com/Varieties.html
I found:
CAPELAS
Dark Portuguese
Portuguese White DFIC 292
Portuguese White DFIC 295
UNCLE CORKY'S
ST. JORGE
ST. GEORGE

And I am sure that there are many more/others.
I know of at least one (nearby) Spanish fig site,
but none comes to mind of a Portuguese one.
Maybe other more knowledgeable people can help.

How about the good/fabulous but late fig Black Madeira?


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Bass

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Reply with quote  #3 
I have one that came from a small town in Portugal called Fundo da Vila. It's a dark fig, I named it after the last name of who brought it from there, "Carvalho".


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nelson20vt

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Reply with quote  #4 
Gorgi there are allot more varieties some are just different syn. Depending on where you live for the above names listed. The Black Madeira Im going to get some cuttings from Madeira next summer of a variety we have on the island that goes by " Figo Preto" Black Fig. And then try to get some cuttings of Black Madeira and compare.

Capelas was named Capelas because it was found in Capelas- Ponta Delgada a town in Sao miguel, Azores island. Is that what its actually called I guess it is now.

Pingo de Mel is the most misnamed fig in portugal any fig that produces a drop of honey out of the eye people are calling it pingo de mel . Pingo de mel is also a syn. for Moscatel Branco.

Lampeira was the name used in The Algarve Region. The rest of Portugal it went by the Name of Lampas or Lampa Preta. Same fig in Madeira island is called Burro talk about confusing. Lampa Preta is a very Popular fig in Portugal today and is considered the best Breba fig in Portugal. I am trying to work something out with a nursery in portugal to get one sent to Canada can only imagine the cost.

Heres a Pic of a real Lampa Preta



I will add more to the list when I find them and try to get the syn. in there too.

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nelson20vt

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Reply with quote  #5 

Oh the Nursery I was refering too is http://www.plantula.com you have to click on the word figueiras. They have 13 varieties and said they will ship anywhere but they only speak portuguese. Jon not sure if i can post links to other Nurseries here if not please delete the post.


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Reply with quote  #6 
Like it ain't bad enough trying to name varieties in english now you have to go and add portuguese to the confusion, too! LOL



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nelson20vt

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Reply with quote  #7 

LOL aint that the truth. Its been a goal of mine to find as much info as I can on figs from my own country but its not been easy considering people are coming up with new names all the time for already named varieties.


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Reply with quote  #8 
I did buy 1 from Bass last season called Dark Portuguese but im not sure if that is the one he mentioned here in his post, i think it came from a neighbor that brought it here from Portugal.
I my add it leaves looks a little similar to Hardy Chicago but still way early to tell what it will do although it grew last season very well and  gave figs but they did not ripen as its young , next season it will give me ripe figs i can tell and will post em.
Nice that you posted all them types Nelson.

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Bass

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Reply with quote  #9 
The Dark Portuguese I discovered here in my town, that came from Portugal many years ago. It's a very tasty fig, has produced some brebas in some years. This one is different that Carvalho. It might be known under a different name in Portugal, but not sure.


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Reply with quote  #10 

gorgi
I opened the www plantula.com site in your post above but closed it right away because the opening home page had just too many fungus gnats flying around which reminded me of too many of my dead cuttings last year.

Edit: Correction, the mentioned post was by nelson20vt.


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gorgi

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Reply with quote  #11 
Ottawan,
I noticed the flying critters too and I have no idea what they are;
gnats, fig-wasps, flies, bats, who knows?
BTW, it was not me who posted the site...
It looks intersting and I need to find a way to translate it.



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Reply with quote  #12 
Here's a translation of the varieties:

LAMPA PRETA (Producer of Figs Lamp) The fruit is pear-shaped and of good caliber
(16 fig / kg). Epidermis green with hints violáceos.Polpa pink, juicy and
sweet. Maturation in the 1st half of Junho.É the best producer of figs lamp.

MAIA: (Producer of Figs Lamp) The fruit is powered and large caliber (10 fig / kg). Epidermis amarelada.Polpa clear, sweet and very juicy. Maturation in the 2nd half of June.

PRINCESS: (Producer of Figs welcome) The fruit is pear-shaped and of good size (19 fig / kg). Epidermis amarelada.Polpa very clear, juicy and very sweet. Maturation in late July.

PINGO-DE-MEL: (Producer of Figs welcome) The fruit is pear-shaped and of good size (23 fig / kg). Epidermis amarelada.Polpa clear, juicy and sweet. Maturation in the 1st half of Augus

Da ponte: (Producer of Figs welcome) The fruit is globular and size medium (24 fig / kg). Epidermis amarelada.Polpa green pink and sweet. Maturation in the 1st half of August.

PALMARES: (Producer of Figs welcome) The fruit is turbocharged and good size (20 fig / kg). Epidermis amarelada.Polpa green light and sweet. Maturation in the 1st half of August.

Bebera WHITE: (Producer of Figs welcome) The fruit is pear-shaped and of good size (18 fig / kg). Epidermis rosada.Polpa crimson, juicy and sweet. Maturation in the 2nd half of August.

other varieties: :Esmirna, Preto de Torres Novas, Rei Branco, S.João Branco, Três no Prato


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Italiangirl74

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Reply with quote  #13 

What wonderful Portuguese varieties! I should add a portuguese to my collection. I have none.  Very interesting.  I will look at these varieties.


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Reply with quote  #14 

Maggie the easy part is done finding the names of the varieties the hard part now is finding discriptions and hopefully pics of leaves and figs to compare to other varieties that are now in north america with english names. Such as Black Portugal ,Dark Portuguse, The White portuguese from UC Davis and a few others. Also that variety that is called Cachopo translates to Cluster in english because it produced clusters of figs. I believe that the unlce Corkys does the same but need to find evidence of the Cachopo variety first wich will be very very hard.


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Reply with quote  #15 

Ciao Nelson. I am trying to do something similar because of the English names attached to alot of the old Italian varieties. Just trying to find the original names, this is why I have Mongibello cuttings from Sicilia(Catania) coming soon. Whats good for us is we still have a very good connection with our homelands and the fig comparisons are more readily available and the research in this particular fig area may be easier for us than for alot of our other fig friends, this will help to spread the information to the whole community. I never would have thought so many distinct and interesting Portuguese varieties. I always knew Portugal and her islands had alot of figs, but never was around or priviledged to be around alot of Portuguese people to really talk figs with them and ask and compare notes with theirs and ours. Maybe when I am in Cape Cod,Mass, I will look around and ask the Portuguese there. We will be going next year as my husbands fathers family are all from Boston. Cape Cod area has a very large Portuguese population.


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Reply with quote  #16 

Maggie I too had no Idea there were so many Varieties there are even more that I need too find. I have met allot of Portuguese people here in Toronto who have brought figs from Portugal. Some have no Idea what variety it is others do, Eventually I plan on collecting as many portuguese varieties as I can but this will take some time. I know Adriano has some of the varieties listed above but he too told me he does not have too many portuguese Varieties. Last time I went to Madeira I met a man who lived in california who was taking back a Cherimoya tree & Fig tree with him. I guess thats how ethnic plants spread around.


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Reply with quote  #17 
I'm jealous. You southern european types have so many "ethnic" figs to choose from. I have a Castle Kennedy ordered and I guess this Scot will have to satisfy himself with just one. :(
Oh well, my cherokee side has muscadines! :)

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Reply with quote  #18 

BTW I'm a Scot I will not entertain the suggestion for an ENGLISH brown turkey.


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Reply with quote  #19 

Ciao Warrior, you have a good sense of humor. I like that!


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Reply with quote  #20 

Yeah well, I bet that castle kennedy will be colored in a sett (plaid to the rest of y'all) and taste like haggis. ;)


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Reply with quote  #21 
I certainly hope Castle Kennedy doesn't taste like haggis.   My one trial of haggis was enough for me.  (though I did enjoy the rest of my meal in Kelso, Scotland a number of years back). 

Warrior.  Keep an eye out for "Great Scot" organic beer.  A little pricey, but for a Scotish beer not bad (price-wise).  Its my libation of choice lately.

~Chills (also a Scot and also a Scott)


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Reply with quote  #22 

Beer? I'll be on the lookout for it but really when you've got Talisker why would you need beer?;)


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Reply with quote  #23 

Ok heres a little update on some of the varieties posted need to find more info on some of the others.
 

Bacorinho. Described and figured by Bobone (1932) as commonly grown at Loulé’,

Portugal. Figs turbinate; stalk short; skin green, with obscure violet tint; pulp carmine,

coarse; quality good.

Badalhouce. Described and figured by Bobone (1932). Breba crop especially good;

fruits large, pyriform, greenish yellow; pulp carmine; texture fine; quality very good.

Second-crop figs not described.

 

Belmandil. (syn. Cara Lisa). Described by Mello Leotte (1901). Name comes from

bello, “fine,” and mandil (roupa), “linen,” in reference to the texture of the skin.

Specimens collected at Loulé, Portugal, and described by Bobone (1932) under the name

Cara Lisa, were very similar, and probably identical to Belmandil.

Breba crop none; second crop requires caprification. Second-crop figs globular,

without neck, smooth; stalk short; color green tinged with violet; pulp carmine; flavor

sweet and agreeable; quality good.

 

Cachôpeiro Branco (probable synonyms are Lampo Branco, Vindimo Branco, Santa

Catarina, Roma Branco). Described by Mello Leotte (1901) and Bobone (1932);

illustrated also by the latter. Cachopo, described by Mello Leotte, may also be the

same, although he reported the second crop set fruit without caprification. Brebas

mature in Algarve from the middle of May to the end of June, while the second crop

ripens in the middle of August.

Brebas pyriform to turbinate, with thick neck and short stalk; color greenish yellow.

Second-crop figs oblate-spherical, without neck; pulp rosy chestnut; texture coarse;

quality good.

Carvalhal. Described by Mello Leotte (1901). Name refers to a fig of the Carvalhal

estate. Tree producing abundantly first and second crops, the latter being artificially

caprified.

Leaves 3-lobed, with violet stipules. Brebas large, pyriform; skin violet; pulp rosecolored.

Second-crop figs smaller, globose, of same color as brebas.

Castelhano Preto (syns. Euchário Preto, Castelhano da Rocha). Described by Mello

Leotte (1901) and Bobone (1932); the latter illustrates three different forms, as grown at

Cacela and Silves in Algarve.

Figs turbinate to pyriform; stalk up to 1/2 inch long; color dark violet; pulp dark

chestnut, coarse, sweet; quality good.

 

Castelhano Branco (syn. Euchário Branco). See account by Mello Leotte (1901), and

description with illustrations by Bobone (1932). The former states that the word

euchário is from the archaic eucha, “chest,” and caixa “case”; i.e., “fig of the case.” He

also gives Euchário Preto as a synonym; but Bobone points out distinctions in size,

color, and flavor. Both require caprification and produce a second crop only.

Castelhano figs are turbinate, rounded at apex; color green, obscurely tinted

chestnut; pulp carmine; flavor agreeable; quality fair. Season medium. According to

Mello Leotte, these figs, properly matured, are unrivaled in quality, and bring high

prices in the market.

Comadre. Regarded by Eisen (1901) as the best white drying fig of southern

Portugal. The term “comadre,” however, commonly designates a grade of dried figs,

and not any distinct variety.

 

Cótigo (syn. Cótio Tinto). Described and figured by Bobone (1932), who stated that

Mello Leotte (1901) regarded this variety as a mutation of Cótio, producing colored

rather than green figs. Second-crop figs green, with violet spots; stalk medium; pulp

carmine; texture coarse; quality good.

Cótio (syn. Malaguenho Branco). Described by Mello Leotte (1901) and Bobone

(1932)—the latter with illustrations—as the most important commercial variety of

Algarve. The orchards of Lameira are composed almost wholly of Cótio trees. At

Cacela, it is known as Malaguenho Bravo.

Breba crop none. Second-crop figs medium, turbinate; neck short and thick or none;

stalk short; color green; pulp carmine; texture coarse. Quality good, especially for

drying.

 

Dois à Fôlha. Described and illustrated by Bobone (1932) as a common Portuguese

fig, so named because two figs appear in the axil of each leaf. Figs are globular, with

short stalk and greenish-yellow skin.

Lampeira (syns. Portoghese, Lampas, Figue des Confiseurs). Described and

illustrated by Gallesio (1817), Gasparrini (1845, as Ficus pachycarpa var. lusitanica),

Pasquale (1876), Mello Leotte (1901), Eisen (1901), Simonet et al. (1945), Tamaro (1948),

and Baldini (1953); the last with illustration of leaf and brebas. It is also figured by

Tamaro. According to Gallesio, this variety was very common in Tuscany, especially at

Florence, and was figured as No.17 under the name Lampas Portoghese. Eisen praised

it highly by stating: “What the White San Pedro is for Andalusia in producing the

luscious brebas, the Lampeira is for southern Portugal.” It is probably this same variety

which Bobone (1932) described and illustrated as Figo Burro, with the following

synonyms: Burro, Gentio, Roma Preto, Bispo, Cachôpeiro Preto, Bacalar Preto, Lampo

Preto, and Vindimo Preto. Lampeira was once introduced into California, probably as

P.I. No. 18,871, and fruited at Niles, but no later records of its occurrence or behavior in

this state are available. The following description is after that of Simonet.

Tree moderately vigorous. Leaves small; deeply 3-lobed.

Brebas large, about 3-1/2 inches long and 2-1/2 inches broad, pyriform, with

prominent neck and medium stalk; average weight 102 grams; eye large, open, scales

violet; color greenish yellow, tinged with violet on sunny side; skin glossy, rather thick;

meat thin, white; pulp rosy amber, with violet shade toward the eye; seeds rather

numerous. Quality excellent; appearance fine.

Second-crop figs medium or below, about 2 inches long and 1-1/2 inches broad,

pyriform, with short, thick neck; eye partly open, scales rosy; skin delicate, checking at

complete maturity, green flushed with violet; pulp deep red; seeds small. Second crop

negligible without caprification.

Moscatel Branco (syn. Pingo de Mel). Described and illustrated by Bobone (1932) as

a Portuguese variety, not grown commercially, but widely distributed in Algarve. The

name Pingo de Mel, “honey-drop,” is sometimes given because of the honeylike gum

which exudes from the eye. The trees generally produce two crops.

Breba crop small; fruits pyriform, with short, thick neck and short stalk; color

yellowish green; pulp red, with traces of violet.

Second crop heavy; figs pyriform to spherical; skin smooth, somewhat puberulent;

color dark green; pulp red; texture fine; quality very good.

 

Moscatel Preto (syn. Bêbera). Described and illustrated by Bobone (1932). Known as

Moscatel Preto at Coimbra, and Bêbera at Cacela and on the island of Madeira.

The tree produces two crops. Mello Leotte (1901), on the other hand, described

Bêbera as a variety which does not produce a first crop, and the second crop as

requiring caprification.

Brebas oblique-pyriform, sometimes much elongated; neck thick; stalk short; color

violet-black; pulp dark carmine, streaked with violet; flavor sweet and agreeable.

Second-crop figs pyriform, elongated specimens unusual in having the internal cavity

narrowed at the base rather than rounded; stalk short; color green toward the stalk,

violet on

 

Passanudo. Described and illustrated by Bobone (1932). Second-crop figs medium,

turbinate or oblate; stalk very short; skin yellowish green, smooth, dull, commonly

checking when mature; pulp carmine, coarse, of agreeable flavor; quality good.

 

Rebanquio. Described and figured by Bobone (1932) as a pyriform, green fig, with

red pulp of good quality.

 

São Luiz. Described and illustrated by Mello Leotte (1901) and Bobone (1932) from

specimens grown at Loulé’. Second-crop figs turbinate, with short, thick neck and short

stalk; skin thin, of fine texture; color violet-black; pulp light red; quality very good.

 

Sopa e Vinho. Described and illustrated by Bobone (1932) as a Portuguese variety,

producing one crop only at Cacela in late August and early September. Figs medium,

turbinate, with short, thick neck; stalk short; color green, tinged with violet; pulp

carmine; texture fine; quality good.

 

Três um Prato. Described and illustrated by Bobone (1932) Collected in Algarve, and

believed to be of the Smyrna type. Figs medium, pyriform, with prominent neck; skin

greenish yellow, smooth, sometimes checking; pulp rose-colored; flavor agreeable;

quality good.

 

Urjal (syns. Capa Rôta, Branco). Described by Mello Leotte (1901) as Urjal, a

corruption of the word argel, signifying “soft”; i.e., fig of the soft skin. Described and

illustrated by Bobone (1932) as Capa Rôta, with synonyms as above.

This Portuguese variety has two crops.

Breba crop small; fruits large, pyriform, green; pulp amber. Second-crop figs below

medium, turbinate, without neck; stalk medium; pulp coarse in texture, amber; quality

fair.

Verdeal. Described by Mello Leotte (1901) and Bobone (1932), the latter with

illustrations. A Portuguese variety, producing a good second crop in August. Figs

medium, short-pyriform to oblate, with or without short, thick neck; stalk short; color

dark green; pulp carmine; quality fairly good.



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nelson20vt

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Reply with quote  #24 

Some Links I Forgot to post Earlier some are pdf in portuguese.

http://www.esab.ipbeja.pt/c_h/paginas/Cultiv_figue_ch.htm

http://www.draplvt.min-agricultura.pt/documentos/folheto_prod_figos_lampos_qual.pdf

http://www.esab.ipbeja.pt/c_h/publicacoes/Fruticultura/Figueira/folheto_adaptabilidade_figueira_beja.pdf

I have more somewhere must be on my home computer.

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Reply with quote  #25 
Fig Orchard In Portugal








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Reply with quote  #26 
Nice pics shows a good example of how to prune in last pic. All those cuttings on the ground caught my eye.
Sal 

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Reply with quote  #27 

You know what Sal I didnt even notice the cuttings on the floor until you mentioned it, and here we are trying to get them lol and they are wasting them.


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Reply with quote  #28 

If they are all one variety orchard ex Lampa preta, they will go back and pick all those cuttings and make new rows.  If they are one variety to avoid mis matching certain varieties.  That is if they want to expand orchard, this is very common in Mediterranean countries. Usually one orchard is one variety and next rows are another, ect ect. This is what my family does in C.Frentano. The cuttings lay then all picked up and stuck in ground. Europeans hardly ever waste anything, especially Southern and Western.  Ciao


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Reply with quote  #29 

Maggie you are correct this field is owned by a University and they too have it devided each variety is in specific rows. I guess thats the best way to avoid confusion down the road.


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Reply with quote  #30 
In 2009 I was in Portugal in September right smack in the middle of the fig season, I was walking by a house that had a fig tree in its yard with huge figs (size of a pear) as I was admiring them the owner stepped out after a little chat this man gave as each a fig, my daughter 17 could not finish hers.
 The man only called his figs Algaravios because they originated from Algarve
but we were in Tras-os montes, does anyone know this fig and its name. Nelson I heard of Abebereira as another Portuguese fig.

Jose in ottawa
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Reply with quote  #31 
Hi Jose, there is a variety known as Algarve but the Algarve region has atleast 50 named varieties plus allot of wild figs because they have the fig wasp.

I know the most common figs in Northern Portugal is Douro & Branca Do Douro both large figs. Abebereira is a Portuguese fig and there seems to be allot of different strains of this fig in Portugal depending on where you live it might be a different fig all together with the same name. For example in Madeira Island Bêbera & Abebereira is the same but in Main land portugal it seems to be two different varieties all together as I have noticed allot of nurseries selling them both as distinct varieties.

If you go towards the bottom of the page on this link you will see a few different figs grown in the Algarve region. http://terradoscaes.blogspot.com/2010_11_01_archive.html

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Reply with quote  #32 
Nelson, this is a good post. I am "rather"motivated on having more ethnic and E'pean figs in my collection. I have 11 varieties of ethnic figs growing  and some recent cuttings of Moscatel Preto from Toronto. For now, I am somewhat disappointed with Capelas taste and most impressed with Barbillone. The last 2 seasons, I find Capelas is productive but looks similar to Brunswick. Hopefully someone with more experience on this variant can share their observations. Meantime, the only person I know of with more ethnic figs in Canada is Adriano and he is not ready to market them. I am sure in Toronto and Vancouver there are several  interesting ethnic variants like the one I found in a Greek church here but I don't like its taste. Its a large green fig with nice strawberry colour interior. There are a few ethnic fairs in Vancouver during summer where all kinds of stuffs are sold. Perhaps going to such fairs may be a good thing to talk & hunt for such ethnic figs. I may just do that as there are plenty of ethnic foods to sample. By the way, I read somewhere that in Toronto there is this successful ethnic contractor that has an enclosure that houses a bunch of heirloom ethnic figs. May be it would be an idea to get in touch with the writer to find out who this contractor is.
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Reply with quote  #33 
Hey Paul any info on this contractor? I may just touch base with him. I too like heirloom figs and have about a dozen figs from Portugal and quite a few ethnic figs. Paul, Capelas sampled at Adriano's are outstanding large figs.

Tree is inground and 30 years old that might be the trick is to wait until it gets a bit older, but I do agree with it being similar to Brunswick in fig shape and leaf but has thinner skin and much better tasting to me atleast. But I too didnt sample any figs this season from my own plant between the squirls stealing the ripe figs and some spliting due to over watering.

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Bass

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Reply with quote  #34 
Speaking of portuguese varieties, I was contacted recently by a Portuguese fig grower who said that the Dark Portuguese I have is very similar to a fig called  Figo Moscatel. Have anyone heard of that variety? 
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rafed

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Reply with quote  #35 
Bass,

I just got this fig "Figo Moscatel" from a member.
It is still small ( 16 oz cup ).

Sorry, But I can't reveal the source just yet.

What all can you tell me about it?



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Reply with quote  #36 

My Capela (from Adriano) has been productively fruiting for the last two years and my experience has been that most of the fruit split wide open when there is just a little rain during ripening time.


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Reply with quote  #37 
Bass I was able to obtain a couple cuttings of Moscatel Preto from my dads neighbour who purchased it in Portugal 2 years ago. Here are pics of the fig I was able to sample he told me Breba ripens around Late July here in Toronto Main crop mid September and Brebas are much larger than main crop. Tasted very good his plant is 2 years old and atleast 7ft. Leaves were mostly 3 lobed and single lobed if I remember correctly.







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Reply with quote  #38 
Bump.

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Bass

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Reply with quote  #39 
Great... Moscatel preto looks like a nice fig. May not be exactly the Dark Portuguese I have, judging but the color of the pulp.


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Reply with quote  #40 
Bass, Moscatel Preto is a high quality fig. Better tasting than Moscatel Branco. It is slightly larger than
Dark Portuguese. An easy variety to root. Main crop ripens here.

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Reply with quote  #41 
Ruuting
You need a "Bump" in the George pot holes thread....

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