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GeorgiaFig

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Registered: 05/03/10
Posts: 584
Reply with quote  #1 
Several fig varieties have "strawberry" in their name, but do any varieties actually taste like strawberries, or does this just refer to the color more than the flavor?

Does the "Raspberry Latte" taste like raspberry or is that also more a description of the color?

Hope everyone is well and that you are having a good growing season.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b
pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #2 
Strawberry just refers to color, in my experience. Raspberry latte has a darker color, and grew up from a seed under my coffee tree, hence its name

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GeorgiaFig

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Jon.

It's a nice name, and our Raspberry Latte is a strong grower.

I still think calling it "Strawberry" or "Raspberry" is going to be helpful in encouraging kids to try the figs. 

Most kids recognize strawberry and raspberry as either berries or flavors they like, so hopefully this will encourage kids to try figs and enjoy these healthy fruits.

Anybody know a variety of fig that kids especially like?

What variety is the best tasting overall for kids and adults?
Italiangirl74

Registered: 09/14/07
Posts: 629
Reply with quote  #4 

Georgia Fig, 

Its very hard to say what kids or others would like on their palet, As I always say, " taste is on the tongue of the beholder "  I  particularly like figs that are more fig tasting than sweet, I also like a fig that has seeds and makes a nice crunch while chewing, this is just my taste or my own tongue, others don't like it and prefer sweet figs.  I also tend to like dark figs as opposed to the white or Verde or other light figs, yet my Paradiso is one of the top favorites for me!  So go figure.  I think we all may taste the same fig somewhat different.  I think its good to get kids to enjoy figs. I grew up eating figs  from birth and other kids my age, we ate them and knew what they were, we didn't have blueberries or strawberries or those types more readily found in America. Expose the kids to this healthy treat, there's more to figs than just the newtons!  Ciao Georgia fig and happy healthy growing season to you. Ciao ciao.

P.S.  Expose the kids to all varieties and see what they may like.  They may like all of them, and if its the ones you grow, then you have it made!


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GeorgiaFig

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Registered: 05/03/10
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Reply with quote  #5 
Thank you ItalianGirl.  Wise advice indeed.

We have been trying to move our children away from the factory produced food in general, and to maximize home grown organic fruits and vegetables. 

And I am planting enough figs to feed all the kids in the area and then some.  So I hope that they will enjoy them, and then maybe grow up with good memories of eating figs from our farm.

And I think you are right about taste being a subjective experience, not just different preferences, but it actually tasting different to different people.

I find beef most unpleasant, for example, and milk is not good either, so surely others are tasting something different than I am.  But milk in cheesecake, ice cream, or aged cheeses (i.e., Parmigiano Reggiano) is good.

So I will try to get the kids to try them all and see if they have a favorite.

I have also found that when the kids participate with planting and picking they are more likely to eat the produce.

Thank you, and very best wishes my friend.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b
snaglpus

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Reply with quote  #6 
I concur with you GeorgiaFig.  A farmer friend of mine sells TONS of figs from his 20 foot tall Celeste fig tree every July.  He said he did not know what type of fig it was until I saw it and sampled the goods last year.  He said when his kids were little they would make fig jam every year but he had to tell the kids the jam was Strawberry Jam.  He said that was the only he could get the kids to eat the jam.  I asked how did he make the jam and he said he would mash up the figs, add sugar and one package of strawberry jello.  He said the kids hated figs but with the strawberry jello added and the seeds from the figs, the kids were tricked to eating "strawberry jam", until they grew up.  Now the tree is HUGE and he sells the figs.  I'll post some pics of his tree later.  cheers, Dennis

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Dennis
North Carolina/Zone 8a
GeorgiaFig

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Registered: 05/03/10
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Reply with quote  #7 
Thanks Dennis.  That is a great story, and a great idea.  Adding a few strawberries to the fig jam sounds pretty good too.

I would love to see pictures of this tree also.

I don't even have a camara.  I grew up in Amish country, and although we are not Amish, we might as well be concerning technology.  But I am going to have to get one so I can start to share pictures of our figs and farm.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b
pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #8 
I just finished tracking down some pix of a "Strawberry" fig sold at a local farm stand, that an inquiring person sent me a couple years ago. It turned out to be a Celeste - not even strawberry colored, but that was the name that the owner was given 25+ years ago when he got it from a friend.

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GeorgiaFig

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Registered: 05/03/10
Posts: 584
Reply with quote  #9 
Hi Jon.  Often the name of the family heirloom fig is whatever Grandma called it.

Maybe someone was making a strawberry mix jam with the figs, and everyone just started calling it the strawberry fig.

I've never had a bad fig yet, many different names, colors, shapes, and sizes, all different and all good.

An interesting story Jon.  Thanks for sharing it.

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b
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