Register  |   |   | Chat
 
 
 


Reply
 
Author Comment
 
possum_trot

Registered: 03/19/10
Posts: 197
Reply with quote  #1 
I have rooted 3 cuttings of Jon's Raspberry Latte and they are doing very well. I Have been looking forward to having figs from these little trees some day. But, this morning I was thinking about the fact that these trees are seedlings and wonder if they will require the fig wasp to produce fruit. Can anyone tell me?
Thanks.
Susan

__________________
Susan

Brown County, Indiana
zone 6
pitangadiego

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered: 09/03/07
Posts: 5,081
Reply with quote  #2 
It appears to be a common fig.

__________________
Encanto Farms Nursery
http://encantofarms.com
http://figs4fun.com
http://webebananas.com
"pitangadiego" everywhere
possum_trot

Registered: 03/19/10
Posts: 197
Reply with quote  #3 
Thanks Jon. All 3 cuttings of RL rooted for me. I am already looking forward to starting cuttings again this winter!
Susan

__________________
Susan

Brown County, Indiana
zone 6
noss

Registered: 06/08/09
Posts: 2,062
Reply with quote  #4 
Hi Susan,

What rooting method did you use and congratulations on your success.

noss

__________________
noss Lafayette, LA Zone 9a Wish List: Col de Dame Blanc, Col de Dame Noir, Col de Dame Gris, Scott's Yellow, Tony's Brown Italian, any other fig that is good in the rain/humidity and has a real figgy flavor.
OttawanZ5

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 10/20/07
Posts: 2,181
Reply with quote  #5 
Susan
Rooted cuttings and air-layered plants are not considered seedlings but are, in a way, cloned of the parent plant. Seedlings are grown from the seeds and may not be identical to the plants the seeds were taken from.
No worry about the wasp as Jon mentioned.

__________________
Ottawan-Z5a, Canada
possum_trot

Registered: 03/19/10
Posts: 197
Reply with quote  #6 
Ottawan, Jon reports that the original tree, the parent tree, was a seedling that he found under a coffee tree in his nursery, I believe. I didn't mean that my plants are seedlings.
Thanks.



__________________
Susan

Brown County, Indiana
zone 6
possum_trot

Registered: 03/19/10
Posts: 197
Reply with quote  #7 
Noss, the rooting method that I used was the peat pot inside a clear plastic cup, it was "Dan's baggie method" ( then put inside large plastic totes) except I really didn't pay much attention to whether or not the scions had roots or not when I stuck them. This was the first year that I have tried to root figs and they did pretty well, but I lost a few later, around the time of repoting, and never really figured out why. Some of the cuttings that were very slow to start were put in gallon pots and seemed to benifit from the depth. Maybe 90% of my cuttings rooted but after the losses at repoting I think I ended up with about 60% success. Good enough for the first time. My loses decreased when I started using compost, 1\4 strengh hormex, and not letting them get quite as dry. I think Raspberry Latte just did really well for me. 
Susan 

__________________
Susan

Brown County, Indiana
zone 6
GeorgiaFig

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 05/03/10
Posts: 584
Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Susan.  I had 100% success with the Raspberry Lattes also.  And they have been very strong, aggressive growers all summer.  Even in part shade and with pinching back they are over 4 feet tall now.

I am anxious to see how they over winter here in ground in zone 7b.  I will provide protection for the RLs this first season or two (which I have never done for any fig before here; but I want to be extra cautious as the cold hardiness is unknown).

But in a couple years it will be survival of the fittest for all of the figs. 

All of our figs are in ground and unprotected, and so far they are doing great.  It's not unusual for them to freeze back to the ground the first few years, but they always bounce back from the roots, and after they get well established and acclimate they all seem to do just fine.  So in a few years we will know how cold hardy the Raspberry Latte is.  It will be great if it holds up, and if it doesn't, I will leave these to my warmer climate friends. 

Sounds like a great fig though, so it's definately worth a try.  One of the joys of gardening is pushing the limits and succeeding at things others told you couldn't be done, like those of you that grow figs so successfully in Michigan, Cananda, etc.  That's got to be a pretty good feeling and a lot of fun to show people figs growing in your yard that far north.

Growing figs here in the South really isn't much of challenge.  They pretty much grow like weeds, so no one is really that impressed locally.  But I'm growing the figs to eat, not to impress the neighbors!  ;-)

Best wishes to all.

John
North Georgia Piedmont
Zone 7b
possum_trot

Registered: 03/19/10
Posts: 197
Reply with quote  #9 
John, my RL have all done well, but not nearly as well as yours! Mine are still pretty small. The other cuttings that did really well for me are Hardy Chicago. At least I think that they are HC - I got the parent tree from Lowes. 100% of the cuttings survived and they are about 2 ft tall. My trees spend the winter in an unheated room in my drafty old house and do great until early spring when enough light for every one becomes an issue. I hope to put up a little green house this year and move them into it in the spring when they start to leaf out but it is still to cold to go outside...
Susan

__________________
Susan

Brown County, Indiana
zone 6
GeorgiaFig

Avatar / Picture

Registered: 05/03/10
Posts: 584
Reply with quote  #10 
Hi Susan.  We are growing these in ground, fertilized (Spring only) with kelp and fish meal, and we had a very warm, very wet summer, so everything grew like weeds.

Sounds like you are doing all the right things though, and getting great success.

Hope you are having a good summer.

Best wishes.

John

Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Powered by Website Toolbox - Create a Website Forum Hosting, Guestbook Hosting, or Website Chat Room for your website.