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hoosierbanana

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Registered: 10/23/10
Posts: 1,591
Reply with quote  #1 
How many days after figs emerge are they ready to pollinate?
Thanks

go4broek

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Registered: 10/20/10
Posts: 1,203
Reply with quote  #2 
What kind of fig are you asking about?

alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #3 
Much of June and July is good for pollination if you have a fig tree that needs pollination.
hoosierbanana

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Registered: 10/23/10
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Reply with quote  #4 
These are common figs. Hand pollinating, so I need to know when the syconia is ready to be fertilized. I guess about a week or two, or maybe when the fig is about half size?


go4broek

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Reply with quote  #5 

Common figs do not require pollination

hoosierbanana

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Registered: 10/23/10
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Reply with quote  #6 
For seeds they do.
I am trying to produce apomictic seeds using Osage pollen, among other things. There was no interest in a previous post on the topic, so I thought I would not bore anyone with the details.
Just want to know when that embryo is ready for the baby batter. Sure would appreciate it.

alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #7 
if it were possible now is a great time.  I opened a common fig that fell off my tree early and it was a flower inside.  Just like a Caprifig would be that way now.  Although all female flowers were inside no male in this fig so the fig I opened is a common fig

hoosierbanana

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Registered: 10/23/10
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Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks Alan, I don't have enough figs up here to be doing dissections right now so that helps. Sounds like about two weeks for up here if they are ready down there now. My trees are just putting on main crop now, but there were a few early ones that could be ready, they are the size of an acorn now. Is that about the size of the one you cut open?
pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #9 
I would think you could pollinate them more than once, and one of those times would probably be right. Since seeds, not fruit is the issue.
alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #10 
You are welcome so far this year two figs have fell off our tree prematurely the rest of the figs on this tree are behind the first two.  I am not sure although I think that the early ones fall off  when the flower inside is ready.  The ones that I dissected were about 3/4 an inch long with a slightly smaller diameter.  they started to darken and wrinkle and then they fell off June 29th 2011

Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosierbanana
Thanks Alan, I don't have enough figs up here to be doing dissections right now so that helps. Sounds like about two weeks for up here if they are ready down there now. My trees are just putting on main crop now, but there were a few early ones that could be ready, they are the size of an acorn now. Is that about the size of the one you cut open?
alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #11 
sounds to me like you are trying to make hybrid seeds.  Interesting that you are going to try to do this with orange tree pollen.

Me I just started to try to do something simlar with melon pollen.  if it even works I will likely end up with a mutant plant although it will be interesting to see any results besides failure
hoosierbanana

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Registered: 10/23/10
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Reply with quote  #12 
I think you are right Jon, thanks.

Alan- Apomictic seeds would be clones of the parent, all female, all persistant, maybe with some mutations during mitosis. FMV free is the real selling point, because they will still need a long time to fruit probably. There is not much info out there on the subject, but Apomixis is common in other plants and could be possible in figs for sure.

Melons are tough, your setup looks really good though. Mulch really helps to keep soil off the leaves so that carpet is perfect.
alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #13 
Yes and the artificial turf mat dries out very quick and no melon rot at the bottom + the heat that the black color of the mat radiates are why I got the mat

Melon flowers was the most logical flowers we had to use at the time and Melon have a even higher heat tolerance than figs and they are more aggressive growers than fig trees so I though why not

hmm the counters on my blog must be broken then.  And I was thinking that no one was visiting my blog
noss

Registered: 06/08/09
Posts: 2,029
Reply with quote  #14 
Hi Brent,

I have no idea what you are doing, but it sounds fascinating and I hope you have some great success with it.

How does putting some kind of pollen into a common fig pollinate it if the pollen is from another species of plant?

I didn't see your other post/thread you are talking about, so I'm glad you posted about it again.  Much luck to you,

Alan,

What kind of mat are you using and where does one obtain it?  Does it come in different colors?

noss
hoosierbanana

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Registered: 10/23/10
Posts: 1,591
Reply with quote  #15 
Thanks Noss. There is not much info available (for free), but I found an abstract of a scholarly article that says this crazy plan is possible. My guess is that the pollen from Osage and Mulberry is the right size and has the right chemical signals to stimulate apomictic seed production in figs? Here is the other thread if anyone wants to see the article abstracts I am talking about http://figs4funforum.websitetoolbox.com/post?id=5267165&highlight=apomixis.

The topic is frustrating, exciting, and confusing. And I think it is worth a try.



alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #16 
I bought it from ebay.  Here is an example of what the seller I bought it from has in stock right now.  He him self has lots of colors.  It's made of the same stuff as a fake lawn although he sells lots of colors that no one would want as a lawn

http://home.shop.ebay.com/Yard-Garden-Outdoor-Living-/159912/i.html?_catref=1&_fln=1&_ipg=&_ssn=househomeandmorestore&_trksid=p3911.c0.m282
alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #17 
Brent I just read the information that gave us.  Yes it's very confusing.  It's like learning a new language with all those complex words.  I might try it someday.  Please keep us updated on the results
TucsonKen

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Registered: 07/05/09
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Reply with quote  #18 
This stuff is way beyond my current level of understanding, but seeing JD's post 
about mulberries makes me wonder, since mulberries are so closely related to figs, whether they would be a useful pollen source for your experiment? Just a thought.
alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #19 
noss TucsonKen after having a discussion with a friend of mine (who knows more about plants than anyone I know) a few years ago, after my own research on hybridizing and after seeing this thread I am starting to think that there's a very good chance that trying to create hybrid seeds with two plant species that are not related could create a hybrid seed that will create a hybrid plant yet in most cases the differences in the new plant VS the pollinated plant are so minimal that it would be very difficult if even possible to see any difference.  Pollinating a plant with a different plant species is like trying to grow a plant from fertile fig tree seeds that originated from a wild fig tree most likely it will not give you any fruit that you can enjoy although there is a very tiny chance that it will.  I have read that plants can naturally hybrid with plants that they are not related to (have no idea where I read that) although that is very rare.  even if 99.99999 of my experiments fail at least I had fun trying, would not see it as failure
noss

Registered: 06/08/09
Posts: 2,029
Reply with quote  #20 
Thanks, Alan, for the link to the artificial turf.

Brent, I hope something great comes from your work.

noss
alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #21 
You are welcome

Quote:
Originally Posted by noss
Thanks, Alan, for the link to the artificial turf.

Brent, I hope something great comes from your work.

noss
pitangadiego

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Reply with quote  #22 
I am starting to see unpollinated main crop figs drop from Marabout and some others. The pollinated ones will not be ripe for as much as 90 days. From this I would judge that pollination needs to occur very early in the fig cycle, and that pollination should be attempted at least 90 days before expected ripening, and probably earlier.
alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #23 
My gut tells me as soon as the fig wasp could fit in the fig is when it should be pollinated.  He wants to pollinate a fig of a common fig tree.  Yet the comon fig tree does have a normal female flower so it should be able to be pollinated.  When the figs aborted on my tree they started to ripen then rot and mold very fast yet they were not fruit.  I think that the ripening process would have started right after it where it aborted if it did not abort and I think the pollen needs to be in the fig sooner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pitangadiego
I am starting to see unpollinated main crop figs drop from Marabout and some others. The pollinated ones will not be ripe for as much as 90 days. From this I would judge that pollination needs to occur very early in the fig cycle, and that pollination should be attempted at least 90 days before expected ripening, and probably earlier.
noss

Registered: 06/08/09
Posts: 2,029
Reply with quote  #24 
Has anyone ever said that some of the common figs were able to produce good figs by themselves, but if they were pollenated by the fig wasp, they would be much better?  I may be remembering it wrong.  I was thinking that Martin, or Bass was talking about that.  Maybe it wasn't the common fig, though.

noss
alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #25 
I am not sure if they said anything about it yet I just read this "Lev-Yadun et al. (2006) points out that Common figs are dioecious, with male trees producing inedible seedless figs that maintain the pollinating wasps. It is known that the parthenocarpic Common fig, if pollinated, does produce better quality figs than parthenocarpically developed figs, and contain viable seeds, the progeny of which segregates into male and female figs." Here.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

I just updated a part of my contribution to the FAQ thread to this

Common fig type: Common figs do not require pollination. Yet if pollinated there is a better quality crop of figs that have fettle seeds. Without fertilization the common figs have infertile seeds.

They have a Breba crop then a main crop.  Both these crops have good fresh figs.

The common fig has Mule flowers (produces no pollen/requires no pollen) and has female flowers (pistillate flowers) for both crops.

Although if the figs of a common fig tree type are pollinated the figs will have male flowers (staminate flowers) as well.


Quote:
Originally Posted by noss
Has anyone ever said that some of the common figs were able to produce good figs by themselves, but if they were pollenated by the fig wasp, they would be much better?  I may be remembering it wrong.  I was thinking that Martin, or Bass was talking about that.  Maybe it wasn't the common fig, though.

noss
noss

Registered: 06/08/09
Posts: 2,029
Reply with quote  #26 
That's about what the conversation was about, Alan.

Thanks,

noss
alanmercieca

Registered: 05/31/11
Posts: 1,949
Reply with quote  #27 
You are welcome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by noss
That's about what the conversation was about, Alan.

Thanks,

noss
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