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VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #1 
Totally off topic.
 I just dug up my garlic for this year.  I've been growing and replanting it for about four, maybe five years.  Each year the bulbs get bigger.  This is the hard neck variety.
2016 Garlic Harvest.jpg
I ended up with over 50 bulbs from a spot that's not much bigger than 4x4.  These three were the biggest bulbs.  They were grown in a separate bed that was created for asparagus last fall.  They were spaced farther apart than those grown in the dedicated garlic bed, but those from the garlic bed are still larger than you'll find in the grocery store.

So, this is a shout out for the lowly little garlic.  It's easy to grow, kind of plant it and forget it once your bed is prepared.  With the hard necks you get the added byproduct of garlic scapes (the garlic seed head), which is considered a delicacy.  Garlic scapes, olive oil and/or butter blended to a paste makes a delicious spread.  Homemade garlic powder is the best you'll ever have.  If you let the scapes grow you can use the bubils to grow your stock by hundreds and you'll have full sized bulbs from them in a couple years.

If you've never thought about growing it, you might want to give it a try.

**Wish I was harvesting figs, but one day...one day soon I hope**





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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
Figfanatic57

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Reply with quote  #2 
Looks Great!!!, but that would be enough for me for at least a year...
sobelri

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Reply with quote  #3 
Very nice.  I remember reading that Nov. is the ideal time to plant garlic in my zone.  It's now on the list for this fall.  

Thanks

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SE Texas, zone 8b

VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #4 
Figfanatic57:  That was the plan, to grow enough so that I didn't have to buy any.  I use garlic in almost everything I cook.  I went overboard last year and I still have dried garlic chips.  Even now a year later when I grind it up for garlic powder, the smell is heavenly.  Did I say I like garlic?

Sobelri:  Wellllll, if organically home grown garlic is on your list and can get a couple cutting credits, let's talk ;-)

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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
Garlic_Mike

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Reply with quote  #5 
Looks great.

Do you know what type you have grown?

Late, I'll get back to you.

1600+ plants, 18 types and 1/3 pulled to date.

Mike
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #6 
Mike:
1600!  You'll never ever have to buy garlic ;-)

I wish I understood back then how important the varietal name was.  I got this from the farmer's market because it was the hard neck type.  I didn't think to ask them exactly which variety it was.  The skin has a little purple on it, not too much.  It's the kind with the fewer larger cloves.  I was trying to find a picture from when I planted them.  Whenever I run across them I'll post pics.   A lot of the cloves are as big as a quarter.

Last year I grew 3x a much in a long bed.  The bed look really pretty when the scapes started grow.  I'd love to see what 1600 look like.  Any pointers for how to grow good garlic?  Bed prep?  Fertilizer at planting time or in the spring?  Best time to cut the scapes?  Most important for me, best way to cure and store?

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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
ako1974

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Reply with quote  #7 
I did about 250-275 bulbs this year. That takes me through the year, for fresh eating, canning in recipes, and this year, I'll dry some. I did Xian, Lorz Italian, German Extra Hardy, Romanian Red, Inchelium Red, and Turkish. I rotate, mulch, and compost every year, but many years the bulbs are variable sizes. I replant a certain % of the largest bulbs. In the garden, garlic, tomatoes, and chile peppers are a must-have every year. Everything else is a bonus.
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Arne
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VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #8 
Arne:  That's a lot of variety.  Have you noticed a big difference in the taste?
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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
ako1974

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Reply with quote  #9 
Yes - taste and storability.

Xian is an early harvest, though only a few weeks before the mid/late season bulbs (in my garden). I like Xian because it has what people may call a "true" garlic flavor - it's just right, not overpowering, not too hot, a pleasant lingering aftertaste - and you're supposed to harvest mid-May to mid-June. But it only last 3/4/5 months in storage.

IR is the same thing - a nice, pleasant flavor, not overpowering.

The GEH and RR I've been replanting for about 7 or 8 years. Those bulbs are consistently large, with good flavor, and they store really well (9+ months).

Turkish has some zing, which I like, but my bulbs haven't been growing too large. I need to replant the largest - it's only my 2nd year growing this varietal. But nice, big cloves.

Lorz have put out big bulbs, with good flavor - more on the heat/spicy side.

Oops - I forgot I planted Killarney Red. My first year on that one, but I read it's a good varietal to dehydrate. I haven't harvested yet, but the bulbs look like they'll be big.

I've tried about 2 dozen different varietals. I would love to plant German Red again (not sure why it fell off my radar) - nice and hot.

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Arne
Zone 6a - NJ
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #10 
Good information.  Thank you.  I'll be on the look-out at the farmer's market for the GEH and the RR.  It would be nice to keep some the cloves fresh as opposed as to dehydrated.
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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
Garlic_Mike

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Reply with quote  #11 
Basic instructions;

I am in 6b and plant between October 8 and October 15 depending on the weather.

If I was South of PA I would wait another week or two. The goal here is to establish a root system before frost, but not too big of a plant that could die in the winter, less than 8"

I plant using a 1 1/2" paddle bit to make holes and plant each clove third knuckle deep.

Plants are 6" apart with rows 6 1/2 - 7" apart.

Weeding is important for the bulb size and light for the plant. They do not compete well.

Plants go dormant for the winter and are the first plant to grow in the late winter.

Garlic is a heavy feeder like corn, but I do not fertilize. Where my garden is the garlic will be planted in the Fall. Where I pull the garlic now, I will plant beans or soy beans and the garden will go there next year.

In late Spring after the scapes have formed (Hardneck types), they will need to be cut. when the scape points towards the ground it needs to be cut 1" above the plant.

Earlier will result in a larger bulb with less storage ability. Later will be smaller and store longer.

When they are pulled the plant needs to dry completely before cutting to store. If when you cut the stalk the inside is still green, they need more time.

The largest garlic goes back into the ground.

Do not sore in the fridge or the dark

Out of time, later.
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #12 
When you get a minute:  Best temperature for storage?  Hot garage or cooler house?
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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
Smyfigs

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Reply with quote  #13 
Very nice, Cheryl! I have grown garlic only this year but I did not have anything like yours. I would like to really get more info just havent dedicated the time to research it. Love garlic!
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VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #14 
Thanks.  We've got the cold winter, which is what causes the one clove to split and grow into a whole bulb, but I couldn't comment on how it is to grow in Zone 10a other than you can grow the soft neck.  Mike hit the important points.  If you save your bulbs and replant them they should get bigger every year, plus you'll save on repurchasing seed garlic.

I might finally turn this computer off ;-)

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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
Garlic_Mike

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Reply with quote  #15 
The cooler house.

 I would say temps between 60-75 F would be ideal.

The deeper South Softnecks are the better choice. The clove splitting to a bulb from the cold is a process called vernalization.

Creole garlic is another good choice for the deeper South, but harder to find. Creoles are very hard to adapt to the North. Mine, Keeper, took 7 years.

Keeper, Burgundy and Cuban are recommended

Fillaree Farms has a couple and they are great people
pino

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Reply with quote  #16 
Great to see so man garlic enthusiast!

I was told to plant garlic cloves after the 1st hard frost (mid to late Oct.) not sure why but it seems to work. 

Is it a good idea to dry the harvested garlic in the sun for a week or so before storage?

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Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #17 
Pino:  I've read to protect newly harvested from the sun, so I keep mine out of the sun.  But if somebody else hasn't worried about it and their garlic was fine they can let you know.
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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
jdsfrance

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Reply with quote  #18 
Hi,
That's some quantity !!
I hardly ever use garlic. Perhaps some dried sometimes, but I barely use.
Here in my Zone7, the garlic people plant can rot during the winter, either from cold, or from being wet.
Planting as suggested in a raised bed, might help.

For storage, people would attach them together in a braid and hang the braid to the roof in a protected shelter (in a garage for instance).
They need to stay in the dark and in a environment that is dry.
Once harvested, if you keep them in the light or in the sun, they'll turn green and have a bad taste. That would trigger them growing sooner too, and thus reduce their storage time .


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pino

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Reply with quote  #19 
The braid arrangement for hanging them in a dark area for storing sounds great!

I thought it was beneficial to dry them in the sun initially so that any soil molds/bacteria on the garlic skin get killed before storing them away in the dark?

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Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

rcantor

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Reply with quote  #20 
They need ventilation but not sunlight.
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Galicia Negra, Martineca Rimada, De La Reina - Pons, Genovese Nero - Rafed's, Fioroni Ruvo, Sbayi, Souadi, Acciano, Any Rimada, Sodus Sicilian, any Bass, Pons or Axier fig, any great tasting fig.
eboone

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Reply with quote  #21 
My first ever garlic harvest - after gardening for 35 years or so.  A friend sent me some to plant in exchange for fig cuttings.  An Italian heirloom.  In the photo there is a 32 oz drink cup with a fig cutting in it rather than a quarter for size comparison :)

garlic.JPG 


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Ed
Zone 6A - Southwest PA     
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Wish list: a bountiful harvest to share and enjoy
Garlic_Mike

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Reply with quote  #22 
Looks nice,

Should have waited a little longer.

Optimal time to pull garlic should be when 50-60% of the plant has died.

Garlic will grow up to 35% larger in the last 1-2 weeks before harvest, and will continue to get larger as it cures.

If you miss a scape you will notice the scape stays green as the plant dries. This is because the seed head is drawing the moisture out of the garlic head, making it smaller.

This is also why timing the cutting of the scapes is also important.

Mike
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #23 
Ed:  Isn't it fun trying new stuff.  Growing food from food, also fun.  Sweet potatoes from sweet potato slips, a potato from a potato, green onions from green onions.  Ginger and turmeric from the bulbs.  Lemon grass from a stalk of lemon grass.  Avacado and mango plants from seeds.  I started some Goji berry seeds from store bought berries and the five or six plants from seeds (would have been more had I taken better care of them), they're almost the same size as the plants I bought.  They're all still small, but they'll grow.  (And cuttings for garlic bulbs is a good deal).

Mike:  I got the timing right this year with the scapes.  Everything I had read before said that you're supposed to let the scapes make one full curl and then cut them.  I cut them this time just as they started to make the curl.  I figured if it was drawing energy from the bulb, why wait?

Factoid:  When the garlic is nearing maturity, the scape will straighten back up.  (This one I read and I observed).

**Forgive my long-windedness.  I like to talk garden.

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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
Garlic_Mike

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Reply with quote  #24 
Storage capability vs size.

The sooner you cut the scape, the larger the bulb and the less time it will store.

I have hardnecks that are still usable come April.

The reasoning behind cutting when they point down;

Racombole garlic (hardnack) will curl into a circle or two before they straighten out.

Porcelains and Purple Stripes (hardnecks) will not make a full circle. They will point down, then straighten back up.

Softnecks have no scape. You wait for the stalk to fall over.

I have found the "pointing down" time works as a good compromise and with all the different types I grow specifically targeting a row and constantly checking records is too cumbersome.

It is cell growth that causes the scape curl. The cell growth on the opposite side will "catch up" and the scape will straighten out. So with this many types it is also easier to miss weather they are curling or uncurling. Hence, pointing down.

Another quick tip.

If half of one type is ready and the other half is not. Leave the half in the ground until it is ready, and pull the other. This happens often I'm not sure why. Even if it is a couple bulbs, they may be your best planting bulbs.

Mike
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #25 
So I did good, right?  I cut them when they made a hook.
Maybe this is the Racombole type because last year I did let them make a full circle and I let a few of them straighten back out.

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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
pino

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Reply with quote  #26 
This garlic talk got me all excited so I went out and picked mine. 
Maybe a day or 2 early but we finally got some rain and don't want to take a chance of it rotting.  Mostly a soft neck variety.
 We have had record drought since early May so the garlic is smaller than previous years.
Will leave it in the sun for a couple of days and then hang in the drafty part of the garage.


garlic IMG_3631.jpg 
  garlic hanging to dry in sun IMG_3692.jpg


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Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

Garlic_Mike

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Reply with quote  #27 
I'm impressed,

That's a lot of work. And a lot of great food coming.

About the time mine cure the tomatoes should be ready.

Summer is awesome


toisanwu

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Reply with quote  #28 
This is a great thread.  I've been a long time gardener, but only second year growing garlic.  The first year, I cheapened out and bought garlic from grocery stores to plant (big mistake!).  They came out quite small (softneck and hardneck).  Then last fall, I bought some locally grown garlic (mostly the Music variety) and planted them in October in a raised bed.  I mulched it heavily.  Because the weather was unusually warm here in late fall, the garlic already germinated and started putting out little buds before the snow came.  I covered them up with a black landscape fabric mulch.  And came this spring, they were growing like weeds.

I harvested all the scapes last week.  I must say they tasted great in stir-fries with beef.   I am planning to plant a lot more this coming fall so I could just have tasty scapes!  My garlic plants have mostly green leaves still.  I'll wait till they have about 4-5 green leaves left and then start harvesting them.  The local garlic festivals start here the first week of August, there is when the local farmers harvest theirs.

I see some folks cut the scapes.  I suppose if you have many garlic plants, that is the fastest way to do it.  However, because I only have about 100 or so plants, I prefer to pull them out gently.  That way, I could harvest the more tender part of the scape.  There was no risk of pulling out the plant because of its root system is quite strong.

Pino, you have bumper crop!  Amazing job in braiding them.  I was told by local folks here that, unlike onions, garlic should not be dried under the sun when pulled.  In stead, they should be hang in shaded area to cure.

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Bill
Ottawa, Canada, Zone 5 (USDA Zone 4)
eboone

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Reply with quote  #29 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garlic_Mike
Looks nice,

Should have waited a little longer.

Optimal time to pull garlic should be when 50-60% of the plant has died.

Mike

Thanks for all the instructive info. 

It is hard to tell from the pic, Mike, but all of the plants had at least half of the leaves dried when I picked them, I removed some of those partially loose lower dead leaves when cleaning the bulbs, before the pic.  Most plants had 3-5 leaves that were still green, but also at least that many dead ones. 

I was unable to get to the plants for a week last month and the scapes got a little further along than I was instructed to watch for - some had made a complete circle, some 3/4 circle, just a couple were still pointed down.  They were still tasty in a stir fry.

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Ed
Zone 6A - Southwest PA     
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Wish list: a bountiful harvest to share and enjoy
jdsfrance

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Reply with quote  #30 
Hi,
Here, near harvest, people would make a node with the leaves of the garlic. It is said that doing so the plant stops spending energy shooting leaves and get the energy back to the bulbs and that should allow them to be bigger at harvest  time. You could probably test it on 5 just to see if it works. Take the stalk in your hand at half height and make a simple node.
That will get the leaves to dry quicker too.
Good luck !

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pino

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Reply with quote  #31 
Quote:
Originally Posted by toisanwu
.... unlike onions, garlic should not be dried under the sun when pulled.  In stead, they should be hang in shaded area to cure.
Thanks Bill!
 
Will put them the shade this year and see if I can see or taste any differences.

In past years I dried them for a week in the sun and then in the shade and then store in a cool place that stays just above freezing during winter.  They seem to keep until April then the remaining will start to grow.

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Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

Garlic_Mike

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Reply with quote  #32 
eboone,

I have noticed, now that I opened my mouth, that at the right stage, when you pull them they still look green. Especially in the photos. I'll try to put up a couple picks.

The picks in the ground (many) were what was dug today. In the garden they look almost dead. After they were dug, it looks like they were rushed.

My apologies, always trying to help.

Mike
Garlic_Mike

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Reply with quote  #33 
Garlic, garden, GM-172 leaf and a ridiculous start for a large beefsteak cluster.

IMG_5470.JPG  IMG_5465.JPG  IMG_5488.JPG  IMG_5490.JPG  IMG_5461.JPG  IMG_5446.JPG  IMG_5470.JPG  IMG_5495.JPG 

pino

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Reply with quote  #34 
Mike,
Beautiful garlic harvest and great photos!

When you have some time could you post your garlic curing method?

By the way that GM-172 leaf is huge are the figs as large?


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Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

Garlic_Mike

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Reply with quote  #35 
Hi Pino,

The figs are just starting on the GM-172.

I actually rinse the garlic in a bucket of water and lightly rub to remove some dirt and rinse with clean water.

Then it is laid outside to dry. It is not recommended to wash but I do it. There is too much dirt to bring in the house.

I will leave it outside until it is going to rain and bring it in. Once it starts to dry you do not want it to get wet again. I don't leave it in the sun if it is over 85.

I turn each pile every couple days so moisture is not trapped to form mold.

It then takes @ 3 weeks to fully dry before clipping the bulb from the plant.

If there is green inside when the plant is cut they need more time to cure 
eboone

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Reply with quote  #36 
Really appreciate all of the advice and wisdom for a newbie garlic grower like me!  Thanks garlic_mike, and everyone else.
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Zone 6A - Southwest PA     
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Wish list: a bountiful harvest to share and enjoy
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #37 
I'm afraid I did not wash mine. I let it dry and then shake off the dirt and remove the dry skin
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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #38 
JDSFRANCE:  Meant to ask when you say you put a "node" in the garlic, what do you mean?

Thanks

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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
Garlic_Mike

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Reply with quote  #39 
Not washing is fine.

I just have to bring mine in the house and I'm trying to keep the wife from killing me.

I just ordered 6 plants from James. I'm probably already good as gone, lol.
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #40 
Mike:  I'm sure you have enough good qualities that the wife won't kill you over a little dirt.

I wish I knew then what I know now.  I would have ordered some of James' trees.  Now I'm torn between buying an already ready tree or the satisfaction of turning a stick into a tree.  Decisions, decisions, decisions.

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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
Smyfigs

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Reply with quote  #41 
Yes, this is good info! I didnt know that repkanting some original bulbs would promote a larger bulb. I have not read all posts so sorry if this has been asked...who sells organic heirloom garlic varieties? Ifnit heirloom at least organic. Thx!!
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Meg-Hardiness Zone 10a

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Lamperia Preta
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"The best way to show my gratitude is to accept everything, even my problems, with joy." ~ Mother Teresa  
"Do not pass by a man in need for you may be the hand of God to him." ~Proverbs 3:27~  
"He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted." ~Job 5:4

 

Smyfigs

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Reply with quote  #42 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeryNew2Figs
Ed:  Isn't it fun trying new stuff.  Growing food from food, also fun.  Sweet potatoes from sweet potato slips, a potato from a potato, green onions from green onions.  Ginger and turmeric from the bulbs.  Lemon grass from a stalk of lemon grass.  Avacado and mango plants from seeds.  I started some Goji berry seeds from store bought berries and the five or six plants from seeds (would have been more had I taken better care of them), they're almost the same size as the plants I bought.  They're all still small, but they'll grow.  (And cuttings for garlic bulbs is a good deal).

Mike:  I got the timing right this year with the scapes.  Everything I had read before said that you're supposed to let the scapes make one full curl and then cut them.  I cut them this time just as they started to make the curl.  I figured if it was drawing energy from the bulb, why wait?

Factoid:  When the garlic is nearing maturity, the scape will straighten back up.  (This one I read and I observed).

**Forgive my long-windedness.  I like to talk garden.



I just have to comment here...YES!!! I love to grow my food!!! Its so rewarding! To have a harvest from something timy such a carrot or onion seed is so amazing to me! And, to renew or grow a whole plant from its original parts also amazes me. Rught now I am growing Gokden Kiwi from fruit icut open. Its a variety that isnt too comon or easy to find. I just love it! And by the way, I also enjoy talking about it all so im glad for this topic!

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Meg-Hardiness Zone 10a

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Socorro Blk
Wuhan 
Jolly Tiger
Lamperia Preta
Herschtetten
St. Jean
Black Ischia

"The best way to show my gratitude is to accept everything, even my problems, with joy." ~ Mother Teresa  
"Do not pass by a man in need for you may be the hand of God to him." ~Proverbs 3:27~  
"He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted." ~Job 5:4

 

Smyfigs

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Reply with quote  #43 
Mike, beautiful gardrn! Amazing garlic crop!
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Meg-Hardiness Zone 10a

Looking for...

Socorro Blk
Wuhan 
Jolly Tiger
Lamperia Preta
Herschtetten
St. Jean
Black Ischia

"The best way to show my gratitude is to accept everything, even my problems, with joy." ~ Mother Teresa  
"Do not pass by a man in need for you may be the hand of God to him." ~Proverbs 3:27~  
"He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted." ~Job 5:4

 

Smyfigs

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Reply with quote  #44 
Pino, your garluc is awesome! Okay next year I will plant a good size crop. I have only planted a few heads at a time but thats because I dint know much about garlic. This is really a great thread & im learning a lot even in a short discussion. Gotta find varieties that store longest but still have good flavor. Suggestions?
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Meg-Hardiness Zone 10a

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Socorro Blk
Wuhan 
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"The best way to show my gratitude is to accept everything, even my problems, with joy." ~ Mother Teresa  
"Do not pass by a man in need for you may be the hand of God to him." ~Proverbs 3:27~  
"He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted." ~Job 5:4

 

VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #45 
Meg:  Congrats on your ability to grow onions from seed.  I've never had much luck with onions in general.  And good luck with the kiwi.  I got some started but they kind of just sat there and never grew past the third leaf.  I have no idea what type it was.  I did attend a meeting given by a permaculturist (splg?) in Chicago.  She said she was successfully growing a cold hardy variety.  The name starts with an "A" and has a couple "s"s in it, but I'm not seeing it on Google right now.  She said they're smaller than the regular kind, but she's growing them.

Mike can likely help you with your garlic question.

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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
jdsfrance

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Reply with quote  #46 
Hi verynew2figs,
You take the leaves as a rope and make a node. This will prevent the leaves from making more leaves, and the plant will send the energy to the bulb, causing the bulbs to be bigger.
You have to do that near harvest time, because this causes the leaves to dry in the following weeks.
You can see some pics there : https://www.google.fr/search?q=nouer+l%27ail&biw=1138&bih=523&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwjQs5DP7u7NAhXGnBoKHT09ASgQ_AUIBygC&dpr=1.2

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Climate from -25°C to + 35°C
Only cold hardy figtrees can make it here
Smyfigs

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Reply with quote  #47 
Thx, Verynew2figs! I do grow a good variety of vegetables. I try everything at least to see if I like the variety. We have such a long growing season here that I can grow many crops even a couple of times in the same season.

What I did with my fig interest is at first I bought three established trees from a nursery. I gave one tree to my mom since she also loves figs and then kept the others. I also recently bought a white Genoa from the same nursery. Last year my trees had their first crop of figs after waiting two years! They were good! I just couldnt be on this forum drooling for months on end. Many members here have established trees for sale but depending on where u you are located, shipping may be hefty.

The satisfaction of growing & cultivating your own fig tree is really wonderful so I would encourage you to go ahead with getting cuttings started as soon as you can but do take advantage of your season & pick up a fruiting fig that fits your zone if you can. Its totally worth it!

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Meg-Hardiness Zone 10a

Looking for...

Socorro Blk
Wuhan 
Jolly Tiger
Lamperia Preta
Herschtetten
St. Jean
Black Ischia

"The best way to show my gratitude is to accept everything, even my problems, with joy." ~ Mother Teresa  
"Do not pass by a man in need for you may be the hand of God to him." ~Proverbs 3:27~  
"He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted." ~Job 5:4

 

Smyfigs

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Reply with quote  #48 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsfrance
Hi verynew2figs,
You take the leaves as a rope and make a node. This will prevent the leaves from making more leaves, and the plant will send the energy to the bulb, causing the bulbs to be bigger.
You have to do that near harvest time, because this causes the leaves to dry in the following weeks.
You can see some pics there : https://www.google.fr/search?q=nouer+l%27ail&biw=1138&bih=523&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwjQs5DP7u7NAhXGnBoKHT09ASgQ_AUIBygC&dpr=1.2


This is great info! Im looking at buying garlic for fall planting!

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Meg-Hardiness Zone 10a

Looking for...

Socorro Blk
Wuhan 
Jolly Tiger
Lamperia Preta
Herschtetten
St. Jean
Black Ischia

"The best way to show my gratitude is to accept everything, even my problems, with joy." ~ Mother Teresa  
"Do not pass by a man in need for you may be the hand of God to him." ~Proverbs 3:27~  
"He performs wonders that cannot be fathomed, miracles that cannot be counted." ~Job 5:4

 

toisanwu

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Posts: 65
Reply with quote  #49 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsfrance
Hi verynew2figs,
You take the leaves as a rope and make a node. This will prevent the leaves from making more leaves, and the plant will send the energy to the bulb, causing the bulbs to be bigger.
You have to do that near harvest time, because this causes the leaves to dry in the following weeks.
You can see some pics there : https://www.google.fr/search?q=nouer+l%27ail&biw=1138&bih=523&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwjQs5DP7u7NAhXGnBoKHT09ASgQ_AUIBygC&dpr=1.2


Hi JDS,

This is a really interesting practice. 

My garlic plants' leaves are now starting to turn brown (the tips of the leaves) and I would expect to harvest by end of July or early August.  Would you say now it's too late to do this?

Thanks,

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Bill
Ottawa, Canada, Zone 5 (USDA Zone 4)
VeryNew2Figs

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Reply with quote  #50 
jdsfrance:  I don't know why, but today is the first time the link showing the pictures worked.  Yes, I remember somebody in an on-line group mentioning they tied their onions like that.  Good to know it works for the garlic too.

I've heard about bending the stalk of the onion to help it finish maturing  One year I accidentally bent one of the garlic stalks near the ground.  It ended up being one of the biggest bulbs.

I'm learning lots of tweaks for next year.

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Cheryl
Chicago, Zone 6a (That's what they say, but it still feels like 5)
Growing:
  Hardy Chicago, Black Mission,
Brunswick, Kadota, Ischia Green, Desert King, Osborne Prolific (slow but steady), Malta Black, Violette de Bordeaux, Texas Everbearing, Beall, White Adriatic, Nolo Pink Eyed Lady.
Rooting: Ronde de Bordeaux, Celeste, Nero 600 m, Violetta Bayernfeing, Marseilles Black VS, Celeste.
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