Register  |   | 
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 1 of 2      1   2   Next
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #1 
I wish I'd try this along time ago. It was very easy to do. I'll let you know if it is successful. I grafted green ischia roots into an lSU purple cutting.
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #2 
Here's a photo. Also, should I keep it cooler to allow it to fuse together? I put the roots in perlite - keeping the bottom of the cutting just below ground level. I have a second cup on top for humidity.

Attached Images
jpeg image.jpg (348.62 KB, 223 views)

waynea

Registered:
Posts: 2,013
Reply with quote  #3 
Really interesting, I have never heard of this method, congrats, looks amazing.
ChrisK

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 939
Reply with quote  #4 
Best of luck with your root grafting Troy and I hope your ankle - leg gets well soon.( I hope there's no grafting experiment going on thereLol)
__________________
ChrisK
Atl GA
Zone 7b-8a
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #5 
LOL, I explained grafting to my niece by likening it to cutting off someone's arm and putting another persons arm in its place. Probably too graphic for a 5 year old, but she seemed to like the analogy. Anyways, my ankles doing great thanks. I'm hoping this graft works because I get too impatient with regular rooting.
rx2

Registered:
Posts: 50
Reply with quote  #6 
I have used root stock to graft apples and pears but never a fig.  It should work. Good luck.


__________________________
Rick Lakewood WA Zone 8
JLee

Registered:
Posts: 66
Reply with quote  #7 
This is awesome. Will try for sure.
__________________
Orange County, California / Zone 10b
Wish List: Col de Dame Grise, Aubique Petite, Vasilika Sika, Galicia Negra

-Jeffrey and Anna
HIfarm

Registered:
Posts: 45
Reply with quote  #8 
Interesting idea, thanks for posting.  Please be sure to let us know how it turns out.

John
GeneDaniels

Registered:
Posts: 1,014
Reply with quote  #9 
Hey Troy, can you explain the rationale for root grafting. I think I understand, but I want to hear it from you.
__________________
Zone 7b (Central Arkansas) Seven trees in the ground: Hardy Chicago, Celeste(?), LSU gold, Italian Black, Southern Brown Turkey(?), Strawberry Verte, and Unk yellow.  Trees in pots: VdB, CdD, and Sicilian?
figpig_66

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,842
Reply with quote  #10 
What is the outcome. ? Why is it done. Does it become both figs ? Very interesting
__________________
RICHIE BONI
HICKORY LOUISIANA ZONE 8B WARM HUMID
WINRERS ARE VERY MILD LOW 20'S BUT WARMS RIGHT UP DURING THE DAY. SUMMER IS EXTREMELY HOT & HUMID 100 degrees 100% humidity fig tree grow like crazy but some split from rain & humidity
Wish list. Col de dame blanc
Col de rimada
Lsu numbered figs
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #11 
From what I've read from other posts, the grafted roots will eventually be taken over by the scions own roots. To be honest, I'm mainly just bored. I have been playing around with grafting so I thought this could be a fun experiment. However, if it roots well, then I would probably start doing it with all of my cuttings as it is very easy and fast. Plus, I'm thinking that I could possibly cut the cuttings in half as they do not need as much stem to root- buy one get one free. Mainly though, I'm just incredibly impatient with rooting, and I've already had a few cuttings die from rotting. I'll try a few more tomorrow to have a better idea of the success rate.
figpig_66

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,842
Reply with quote  #12 
Like the way your bordom can pay good. If one pays 50 dollers plus,for a cutting they can live with out gets two. And its fun being a scientist
__________________
RICHIE BONI
HICKORY LOUISIANA ZONE 8B WARM HUMID
WINRERS ARE VERY MILD LOW 20'S BUT WARMS RIGHT UP DURING THE DAY. SUMMER IS EXTREMELY HOT & HUMID 100 degrees 100% humidity fig tree grow like crazy but some split from rain & humidity
Wish list. Col de dame blanc
Col de rimada
Lsu numbered figs
figpig_66

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,842
Reply with quote  #13 
Do you have pics of root stock and cutting before you put them together to see how its cut. If not. Take pucs of the process if you do it once more. If you dont mind.
__________________
RICHIE BONI
HICKORY LOUISIANA ZONE 8B WARM HUMID
WINRERS ARE VERY MILD LOW 20'S BUT WARMS RIGHT UP DURING THE DAY. SUMMER IS EXTREMELY HOT & HUMID 100 degrees 100% humidity fig tree grow like crazy but some split from rain & humidity
Wish list. Col de dame blanc
Col de rimada
Lsu numbered figs
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #14 
I'll do more tomorrow and take pictures along the way. I hope it works, others have had success with it. I am using scions that are swelling due to being in the greenhouse, hope that doesn't affect it too much. I will probably use Chicago hardy roots.
figpig_66

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,842
Reply with quote  #15 
Is now tge time to do grafts. I bought everything to do it but was waiting for spring
__________________
RICHIE BONI
HICKORY LOUISIANA ZONE 8B WARM HUMID
WINRERS ARE VERY MILD LOW 20'S BUT WARMS RIGHT UP DURING THE DAY. SUMMER IS EXTREMELY HOT & HUMID 100 degrees 100% humidity fig tree grow like crazy but some split from rain & humidity
Wish list. Col de dame blanc
Col de rimada
Lsu numbered figs
HIfarm

Registered:
Posts: 45
Reply with quote  #16 
Troy, there is a reason you didn't mention that I thought would be the main "driver" for you trying this -- it sounds like some cultivars are cantankerous rooters, this could be a good way to get some solid roots on them & improve your hit rate with these cultivars.

John
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #17 
That's true John, I was thinking about some of the good varieties that people have been complaining about rooting. I personally am focusing on the figs that are almost 2 months in with no roots. I just read about Sodus cuttings that are very hard to root .
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #18 
I tried several methods with 3 different varieties- black mission, green ischia, and lSU purple- all onto Chicago hardy roots (first picture). I tried wedge grafting and t grafting. One I only did wedge, 2 I did wedge and t, 2 I did t only, and the mission I did one wedge and one t higher up- this one is also starting to leaf out. I put them all in perlite filled cups. I'll keep you posted.

Attached Images
jpeg image.jpg (483.42 KB, 150 views)
jpeg image.jpg (331.31 KB, 156 views)
jpeg image.jpg (339.06 KB, 143 views)
jpeg image.jpg (339.06 KB, 138 views)
jpeg image.jpg (315.15 KB, 128 views)
jpeg image.jpg (326.87 KB, 125 views)
jpeg image.jpg (279.65 KB, 122 views)
jpeg image.jpg (321.33 KB, 117 views)
jpeg image.jpg (317.74 KB, 126 views)
jpeg image.jpg (298.32 KB, 126 views)
jpeg image.jpg (303.53 KB, 125 views)
jpeg image.jpg (327.44 KB, 119 views)

Rewton

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,963
Reply with quote  #19 
Troy - just a friendly reminder - it is LSU Purple, not ISU Purple.  I keep seeing ISU and then think of my alma mater!
__________________
Steve MD zone 7a

Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #20 
My phone autocorrects and I hadn't noticed. Thanks, I'll keep an eye out
deerhunter16b

Registered:
Posts: 796
Reply with quote  #21 
Nice job.... Keep us post on the outcome
__________________
john Zone 7a NY
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #22 
http://rfcarchives.org.au/Next/CaringForTrees/RootGrafting9-91.htm

Here's an interesting article on how to do it.
ChrisK

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 939
Reply with quote  #23 
Well done Troy. Thanks for sharing. The photos are just priceless ! Best of luck with it and keep us posted!
__________________
ChrisK
Atl GA
Zone 7b-8a
ADelmanto

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 970
Reply with quote  #24 
Root grafting. Dress shoes and socks are optional.


__________________
https://www.facebook.com/From-The-Ground-Up-403313193085649/
pino

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,166
Reply with quote  #25 
Troy, great topic and thanks for the excellent information. 
I notice you are grafting way below the bottom node of the cutting.  Is this important or could it be grafted  right on the node?

__________________

Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

HIfarm

Registered:
Posts: 45
Reply with quote  #26 
Pino, 

I'd like to hear Troy's thoughts on this (why he grafted so far from the node) but I have found from grafting other fruit trees that if you are trying to do a cleft graft and graft too close to the bud / node, the grains of the wood start to curve around the bud and it is harder to get a nice straight run to match up the cambium layers.  I haven't tried grafting figs yet but wouldn't imagine that they would be any different.  I don't know if I explained that well, hopefully you followed my description.

John
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #27 
To be honest, I didn't think much about where I placed the roots. However, it is harder to cut around the node and it would be more difficult to peel back the bark. I can try both in the future. I'll see how this batch works.
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #28 
Aaron, that's an interesting video, it gives me an idea for my brown turkey fig. I just have to find more cuttings after the ground thaws.
rx2

Registered:
Posts: 50
Reply with quote  #29 

Yeah. That was some root graft. Almost a root stock graft or was it a root stock graft? Very interesting.

___________________
Rick Lakewood WA Zone 8

bamafig

Registered:
Posts: 162
Reply with quote  #30 
Man, I thought I had heavy clay soil, wow. You could build your own planters with that stuff in the video.
__________________
zone 8
4 (local) Celeste, Papa John, LSU Purple, Green Ischia, Brunswick, white marseilles,  BT,
Panache, Deanna, LSU Black, O'Rourke, Chicago Hardy

Wish list:  VDB, RDB
Gina

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,252
Reply with quote  #31 
Thanks for the video. I enjoyed it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bamafig
Man, I thought I had heavy clay soil, wow. You could build your own planters with that stuff in the video.


That is very much like my soil. Good to see figs growing in it. I was reminded when he was using the balled up wet clay to seal the grafts of the purified clay I made from my own soil to make some forms for pouring decorative concrete.

__________________


WillsC's new fig forum:   http://www.Ourfigs.com  (and blueberries)

nycfig

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 885
Reply with quote  #32 
Very interesting stuff.  Going to do some root pruning in a few days.  I think I'll try some of this.  Don't you need a special knife?
__________________
Danny NYC Z7a

It's all about the figs!

Facebook: NYCfigs

Buying Fig Trees and Cuttings From the Internet
trebor_hgils1

Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #33 
Well golly ! I just stopped to look at this forum...Saw the root graft thread and joined so I can see results :-) I have done quit a bit of grafting and air layering . But not to much root grafting. I got some Sour Sup I can give this try on soon and some other tropicals i can play with.  Just for a thought. This action could increase your out put by probably 3 times maybe more.  one seed producing lots or roots rather than one seed per graft
__________________

If ya can't eat it, it ain't growing in my back yard !
HIfarm

Registered:
Posts: 45
Reply with quote  #34 
Unlike most knives, grafting knives only have an edge on one side of the blade -- so there are left handed and right handed grafting knives so that the sharp edge is on the proper side for how you would cut.  However, many people use exacto knives or even single edge razors and claim good results.  Personally, I prefer a grafting knife, especially if you are trying to cleft graft onto bigger branches -- it is nice to have a beefier blade to make that split for the cleft.  Might not be such a big deal if grafting roots onto a scion though ...

John

Quote:
Originally Posted by nycfig
Very interesting stuff.  Going to do some root pruning in a few days.  I think I'll try some of this.  Don't you need a special knife?
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #35 
Here's the update... Four of the 6 cuttings are starting to bud at day 6. Here's a photo of one of them. All of them are buried up to the graft, so the only moisture the cutting would be getting other than the roots would be from the humidity in the air. This makes me think the roots are working.
As far as tools, I'm afraid I used a rusty exacto knife that was still sharp. I will eventually get a grafting knife, but maybe I'll ask for it as a birthday gift since for some odd reason my family says I'm hard to shop for (they could get me a fig cutting and I'd be happy).

Attached Images
jpeg image.jpg (367.09 KB, 56 views)

Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #36 
Danny,
I'm thinking that the grafting method that places the root against the cambium might be more successful. I forgot to mention that the first one that I did with the small cutting using wedge grafting is showing no signs of growth. Granted it is still pretty early and it was a very thin scion and root. If I had more roots to mess with, I would experiment with very short pieces of cutting to see if I could get away with only using a terminal bud and one internode. I also might try just using one or 2 wedge grafts only to see if that method can be successful. Good luck!
pino

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,166
Reply with quote  #37 
At some point will you need to cut the wrapping around the graft to prevent girdling?
__________________

Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

nycfig

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 885
Reply with quote  #38 
Good results so far.  Is that the only one budding?
__________________
Danny NYC Z7a

It's all about the figs!

Facebook: NYCfigs

Buying Fig Trees and Cuttings From the Internet
snaglpus

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 4,080
Reply with quote  #39 
You guys have done some excellent work in the area of root grafting!  Troy, you and Grasa get a gold star!  Keep up the good work!  I have some tissue culture Hirts "Blue Ischias" that I will be using soon to play around with.  I was going to throw the trees away.  Instead, I opted to use the roots to graft onto some cuttings I got in the fridge.  The pictures you guys posted speaks volumes and helps me alot!

thanks,

__________________
Dennis
Charlotte, North Carolina/Zone 8a 

ChrisK

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 939
Reply with quote  #40 
Thanks for the update Troy. Dennis is absolutely right. You started a trend. I already found root donors from my inground trees and will start playing around as soon as the weather warms up a bit. I hope the foot is getting better!
__________________
ChrisK
Atl GA
Zone 7b-8a
Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #41 
Pino, I'm going to probably score the tape when I repot them this spring. Since I'm still experimenting, I'll probably take the tape off of one completely to see how they scarred.

I'm glad people are trying this! I'm really happy that Grasas did this 3 years ago and documented the process because there is very little information out there regarding root grafting. I don't think Grasas has been on for a few months. If he would sign in, he could probably answer all these questions. I'm glad people are liking the posts though. I'm really excited about the process. I think it might be the propagation technique for the impatient.
pino

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,166
Reply with quote  #42 
I have lots of oversize figs and roots available and now I have a couple of very dear fig cuttings.
My record with rooting cuttings is not great so I would love to try grafting.

__________________

Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #43 
I found new roots growing on them all! The reason I'm hoping this proves to be successful is what's happening to my already rooted cuttings. I think that I'm in the clear and then suddenly they wilt and die. It happened 1st to my lyndhurst white, then I found rotting on almost all of my cuttings and was fourced to cut off the rot and wait again for them to root. My Kathleen black had a beautiful root system and suddenly rotted and wilted. I know that it's not related to over-watering because I have not touched them and Have allowed them to go dry. I think that the batch of Pete Moss must've had some bacteria in it. So as the count of lost figs continues, I am more motivated to find something that works better for me. I will only use perlite in the future, and I'm going to try root grafting on older cuttings today.

Attached Images
jpeg image.jpg (486.23 KB, 43 views)
jpeg image.jpg (332.59 KB, 44 views)
jpeg image.jpg (406.10 KB, 39 views)

pino

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,166
Reply with quote  #44 
Looking good!
Hope they work out for you.

__________________

Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #45 
New grafts. I took pictures of how I root grafted 1 to 2 node cuttings using an older cutting. I got 4 possible plants off of one 8 inch cutting. I used smaller prices of root and used 2 methods. I also did one on the node rather than the internode.

Attached Images
jpeg image.jpg (306.57 KB, 72 views)
jpeg image.jpg (294.31 KB, 70 views)
jpeg image.jpg (289.71 KB, 69 views)
jpeg image.jpg (429.71 KB, 68 views)
jpeg image.jpg (297.38 KB, 65 views)
jpeg image.jpg (309.37 KB, 67 views)
jpeg image.jpg (298.01 KB, 68 views)
jpeg image.jpg (328.30 KB, 63 views)
jpeg image.jpg (283.77 KB, 62 views)
jpeg image.jpg (283.90 KB, 64 views)
jpeg image.jpg (526.95 KB, 66 views)
jpeg image.jpg (178.32 KB, 62 views)
jpeg image.jpg (183.97 KB, 60 views)
jpeg image.jpg (223.50 KB, 62 views)
jpeg image.jpg (200.28 KB, 64 views)
jpeg image.jpg (193.22 KB, 64 views)

pino

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,166
Reply with quote  #46 
Nicely illustrated!

It looks like you cut the root as you would a regular scion for a cleft and other grafts?
Do you need to ensure the cambium of the root is in contact with the cambium of scion?


 

__________________

Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #47 
I am trying to save the wilted trees. I root grafted the on the cambium after I cut the rooted cutting above the soil line. I left one cutting with leaves as a test, but cut off the new growth on the other 2.

Attached Images
jpeg image.jpg (521.53 KB, 50 views)
jpeg image.jpg (665.54 KB, 50 views)
jpeg image.jpg (375.14 KB, 49 views)

Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #48 
Joe, I'm not getting too exact. I just shave the roots into a wedge and stick them in under the bark. Today's cuttings were also pretty dirty from the soil. No sterilization either. I am limited in my mobility so I'm being rather sloppy. We'll see if it matters.
pino

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 2,166
Reply with quote  #49 
I have  some cuttings that are green but won't root or grow. 
I am going to try a root graft and see if anything happens...LOL

__________________

Pino, zone 6, Niagara,  JCJ Acres
Wish; Prosperity&peace for all&more figs;Corky's, Colar, Belloni collection, Luv, Dall'Osso

Troyb

Registered:
Posts: 97
Reply with quote  #50 
Good luck! Post pictures, I didn't think about the green ones.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply